Thursday, May 28, 2015

From Lacrosse Magazine: Thompson, Cummings Earn Second-Straight Tewaaraton Awards

Thompson, Cummings Earn Second-Straight Tewaaraton Awards

from press release
WASHINGTON, May 28, 2015 – The Tewaaraton Foundation has announced University at Albany attackman Lyle Thompson and University of Maryland midfielder Taylor Cummings as the winners of the 15th annual Tewaaraton Award, presented by Under Armour. The Tewaaraton Award annually honors the top male and top female college lacrosse players in the United States.
A finalist for the third consecutive year, Albany's Lyle Thompson is the first men's repeat winner in the history of the Tewaaraton Award. The senior attackman from Onondaga Nation, N.Y., who last year shared the Tewaaraton with brother Miles in 2014, led Albany's top-ranked offense to the America East regular season and Tournament titles, earning his third consecutive conference Player of the Year award and Most Outstanding Player of the America East Tournament. Thompson led NCAA Division I with 6.37 points per game, 121 points and 69 assists.
Thompson's 121 points were second best in NCAA history, trailing only his own mark of 128 points set in 2014. He was named to the USILA All-America first team for the third time and earned the USILA's Lt. Raymond J. Enners Award as the nation's most outstanding player for a second consecutive season. On April 14, he passed 2013 Tewaaraton winner Rob Pannell (354 points) as the all-time leading scorer in NCAA Division I men's lacrosse, and he ended his career with exactly 400 points. Lyle is the third winner from the America East Conference, also including Doug Shanahan (Hofstra, 2001).
The five men's finalists were University of Denver attackman Wesley Berg, Duke University midfielder Myles Jones, University of Notre Dame attackman Matt Kavanagh, Syracuse University attackman Kevin Rice, and Thompson.

Lyle Thompson's acrobatic plays and preternatural feeding ability made him a three-time finalist for the award, and its first two-time winner. His 400 points and 225 assists are career NCAA marks for DI men's lacrosse, and his final two seasons stand as the two top point performances in single-season history. (Rich Barnes)

Reigning Tewaaraton winner and NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player Taylor Cummings helped Maryland capture a second consecutive national championship, leading the Terrapins with 100 points, 37 assists, 41 ground balls, 143 draw controls and 35 caused turnovers. The junior from Ellicott City, Md., earned the Big Ten Midfielder of the Year award and was named all-conference for a third time as the Terrapins earned the top seed in the NCAA tournament. She also was named to the IWLCA All-America first team for the third time. Cummings' per game averages for points, ground balls, draw controls and caused turnovers were tops in the Big Ten, and she ranked first in the nation in points and fifth in draw controls.
 

A do-everything midfielder for Maryland, Taylor Cummings is the fourth player to win back-to-back Tewaaraton Awards, and is the fifth Maryland winner in the past six seasons. (John Strohsacker)

Cummings is one of four players to win the Tewaaraton Award in consecutive seasons, joining Kristen Kjellman (2006, 2007), Hannah Nielsen (2008, 2009) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012, 2013). She is Maryland's sixth Tewaaraton winner, joining Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010), Schwarzmann (2012, 2013), and is the first winner from the Big Ten Conference. Maryland players have won five of the last six women's Tewaaraton Awards.

Read the rest HERE at LaxMagazine

Congrats to Lyle Thompson - Men's Tewaaraton Winner for 2nd year in a row!


Congrats to Taylor Cummings - Women's Tewaaraton Award Winner!


The Tewaaraton Award Trophy




The Trophy 
The bronze Tewaaraton Trophy featuring a Mohawk native was designed and created by Frederick Kail. Spanning four decades, Mr. Kail has distinguished himself as an accomplished sports sculptor and pre-eminent lacrosse sculptor. With this timeless work of art, he captures the exciting spirit and powerful dynamics of lacrosse with meticulous attention to accurate detail. His depiction of a single unnamed Mohawk player, dramatically surging to the front, profoundly portrays the competitive human spirit and superior athletic ability required to win this award. 
Adorned simply in a loincloth and golden eagle feather, the 12-inch figure is foundry-cast in a rich patinaed bronze. It is mounted upon a hexagon-shaped slab of black granite and handcrafted, highly polished exotic Cocobolo wood. The hexagonal base symbolizes the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy: The Mohawk, Cayuga, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca and Tuscarora tribes. With some minor decorative exceptions, the stick is a replica of a pre-1845 Cayuga stick belonging to the grandfather of Alexander T. General of the six Nations Reserve in Ontario. The stick was actually an original predecessor of the modern day stick. To assist with the historical authenticity, Thomas Vennum, Jr. the renowned Native American lacrosse historian, and author of “American Indian Lacrosse: Little Brother of War,” served as consultant to Kail through the development stage of the Trophy. 
The original castings are part of the permanent collection and are currently on display at the University Club of Washington, DC and the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame in Baltimore, Md. Bronze replications of this magnificent trophy are awarded annually to the most outstanding female and male varsity collegiate lacrosse player in the United States.

Friday, May 22, 2015

The Top Three Most Misunderstood Youth Boys Lacrosse Rules

The Top Three Most Misunderstood Youth Boys Lacrosse Rules



Gordon Corsetti writing in LacrosseMagazine online


Youth lacrosse games are tough to officiate. The ball is on the ground more often, the players (for the most part) are still refining basic skills and the game doesn’t always have the smooth flow seen in higher-level games. Factor in age-appropriate youth rules differences and the game becomes harder to officiate and more confusing for new players, coaches and parents.
Gary Alabaster, a lacrosse official in California and speaker at the 2014 US Lacrosse National Convention, submitted a few rules he feels are the most misunderstood at the youth level. I have also seen and heard about confusion with youth rules while officiating in the southeast, working tournaments in the northeast, observing officials out west, and collecting reports from other trainers.
There are misunderstandings all over the country with those involved in boys’ youth lacrosse—and that includes officials. Here are the three we most commonly encounter.

1. Slashing

What We Hear

We as officials frequently hear “That was in the head!” when a spectator sees a stick touch the helmet of an opposing player, and the expectation is that a slash must be called.

How it Really Works

The understanding that “a stick [touching] the helmet of an opposing player” is an automatic slash call is flat-out wrong. The definition of slashing, according to NFHS Rule 5.7 on page 58 of the 2015 rulebook is: “Swinging a crosse at an opponent’s crosse or body with deliberate viciousness or reckless abandon, regardless of whether the opponent’s crosse or body is struck.”
Situation 5.7.1 further states that “B1 (the defender), while playing A1 (the offensive player), makes contact with A1’s head with his crosse. RULING: Contact itself does not constitute a foul. The contact shall be a definite blow or strike. Otherwise, it is considered a brush.”
Brushes still exist at all levels of play. Mere contact or touching of the helmet by the crosse of another player is a brush. If I called every touch to the helmet in a U9 or U11 game, I’d spent more time putting players in the penalty box then actually watching them play. A blow or strike to the helmet (or any vicious or reckless swing, even if it hits nothing) is the requirement for a slash to be called.
Keeping that rule and situation in mind, we must also add the youth rule 5.7.4 on page 106 that states: “Any one-handed check shall be considered a slash, whether or not it makes contact with the opposing player.” 
Read the rest HERE

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Baumers Endow Irish Men's Lacrosse Head Coaching Position



Fighting Irish
Baumers Endow Irish Men's Lacrosse Head Coaching Position

FIGHTING IRISHThanks to a generous $3 million gift from John and Mollie Baumer of Manhattan Beach, California, the Notre Dame head men's lacrosse coaching position, currently held by 27-year veteran Kevin Corrigan, becomes the second Fighting Irish head coaching post to be endowed.
FIGHTING IRISH
Thanks to a generous $3 million gift from John and Mollie Baumer of Manhattan Beach, California, the Notre Dame head men's lacrosse coaching position, currently held by 27-year veteran Kevin Corrigan, becomes the second Fighting Irish head coaching post to be endowed.FIGHTING IRISH
May 20, 2015
NOTRE DAME, Ind. - On the eve of the No. 1-ranked Notre Dame men's lacrosse team participating in the NCAA Championship Weekend in Philadelphia, an alumnus of the University and his wife have made a gift to endow the program's head coaching position.
A $3 million gift from John and Mollie Baumer of Manhattan Beach, California, will underwrite the salary of the head coach, provide stability and resources for the long term and create funds for use within the department and across campus."
"We are very appreciative of John and Mollie Baumer's generosity," said Jack Swarbrick, Notre Dame's vice president and director of athletics. "This is a gift that reflects both the relationship between the extended Baumer and Corrigan families that goes back more than three decades and the Baumers' appreciation of the extraordinary program that Kevin Corrigan has built at Notre Dame.
"Notre Dame lacrosse has not only joined the ranks of the best lacrosse teams in the country, but Kevin has been equally successful in building a program with a winning track record off the field. This is reflected in the selection of the team's youth mentoring program for the ACC/United Way Game Changers Award and Kevin's unique approach to advancing the career aspirations of his student-athletes through a carefully constructed networking program with Notre Dame alumni. The Baumers' gift is a fitting tribute to Kevin's abilities and his dedication to the student-athlete model."
Kevin Corrigan, now in his 27th season at Notre Dame, is the first Baumer Family Head Men's Lacrosse coach.
"I want to thank John and Mollie Baumer for their wonderful gift and their generous support of Notre Dame and our lacrosse program," Corrigan said. "This is extremely meaningful to me, because I know that the Baumer family, like the Corrigan family, shares a great love for Notre Dame and for the value of the extraordinary experience that student-athletes have here."
 

 

John Baumer is a native of South Bend where his father Fred Baumer was employed as the comptroller at Notre Dame for many years. He earned a bachelor's degree in finance from Notre Dame in 1990 and a master of business of administration degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business in 1995. He is a senior partner at Leonard Green & Partners of Los Angeles, one of the nation's leading private equity firms with more than $15 billion of private equity capital raised since inception.
Mollie Baumer is a 1990 graduate of Saint Mary's College where she was a varsity soccer player. The couple has three children in the 9th, 7th and 4th grades who attend Catholic school in the Los Angeles area. John is a member of Notre Dame's Advisory Council for the Student-Athlete, Campaign Cabinet and Wall Street Leadership Committee.
"We have known the Corrigan family for over 30 years and have tremendous respect and admiration for the success that Kevin has achieved in building the Notre Dame lacrosse program from virtually scratch into one of the preeminent programs in the country," Baumer said. "The success on the field combined with the 100 percent graduation rate for the lacrosse student-athletes is a remarkable testament to Kevin's coaching and leadership skills combined with his embracing of the core Notre Dame values."
Corrigan's tenure at Notre Dame ranks as the second longest among current Irish head coaches at Notre Dame (behind only Muffet McGraw in women's basketball) and the second longest among NCAA Division I men's lacrosse coaches (behind only Bob Shillinglaw at Delaware).
The Irish had never played in the NCAA Championships when Corrigan arrived in South Bend, but his teams have earned 20 NCAA invitations and advanced to the Championship Weekend five times (2001, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2015), twice to the title game (2010 and 2014).
The Irish earned the No. 1 seed in this year's NCAA Championship after spending four straight weeks ranked No. 1. Corrigan's record at Notre Dame is 265-122 (.684). His teams have won 17 conference titles, including the 2014 Atlantic Coast Conference championship. In 2015 his Irish won the ACC regular-season crown with a perfect record. Corrigan is a six-time conference coach-of-the-year selection (five times in the Great Western Lacrosse League and in 2012 in the BIG EAST Conference).
Corrigan in 2009 received the Frenchy Julien Service Award from the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association for outstanding and continuous service to the sport. His 2008 team received an institutional award recognizing his program's community service -- and his current squad earned the 2015 ACC/United Way Game Changers Award for its work mentoring youths in local schools. Every one of his Irish lacrosse seniors has graduated.
A 1981 University of Virginia graduate, Corrigan played midfield for the Cavaliers. He served as an assistant coach at Notre Dame in 1983 and at Randolph-Macon in 1984 before spending the 1985 and 1986 seasons as head coach at Randolph-Macon. He then served as an assistant at Virginia for two seasons before taking over at Notre Dame beginning with the 1989 campaign.

-- Dennis Brown, assistant vice president for news and media relations

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Reaction, Photos: Maryland 14, North Carolina 7 in NCAA Quarters

Reaction, Photos: Maryland 14, North Carolina 7 in NCAA Quarters




No. 6 seed Maryland will return to Championship Weekend following a 14-7 romp over third-seeded North Carolina at Navy-Marine Corps Stadium Sunday in the last matchup of the NCAA Quarterfinals. 
The Terps dominated in all facets of the game against the Tar Heels - offense, defense and specials teams.  
Maryland’s shooters showed up to play Sunday, scoring a season-high 14 goals against the Tar Heels. Maryland junior midfielder Bryan Cole led the team with five points on a game-high four goals and one assist. Senior kiddie Joe LoCascio added a goal and three assists. Freshman Connor Kelly added three goals, working on second midfield.
“We wanted to focus on us playing fast, making good decisions, and I think we did that today,” Cole said. “Connor Kelly gave us a really good lift. It’s great to see that hard work pays off. The defense helped us play fast, which helped. Only giving up seven goals to a great offense is a great achievement. I think Coach Conry did well scheming this week.”
Special teams also helped key the victory. Senior face-off midfielder Charlie Raffa finished 12 of 19 at the dot, and junior goalie Kyle Bernlohr made 12 saves. Those matchups allowed the Terps to dictate tempo early in the contest. 
“The face-offs were going to be critical,” Maryland coach John Tillman said. “The wings did a terrific job. We shot very well. We shared the ball. Coach [Kevin] Conry did a great job with the defense. The slid and recovered very well and Kyle [Bernlohr] came up with timely saves. I’m really proud of our guys and happy for them.”
Read it all HERE

Reaction, Photos: Johns Hopkins 16, Syracuse 15 in NCAA Quarters

Reaction, Photos: Johns Hopkins 16, Syracuse 15 in NCAA Quarters



The Johns Hopkins Blue Jays will head back to Championship Weekend for the first time since 2008, surviving an epic comeback from the No. 2 seed Syracuse Orange in the heat of Navy-Marine Corps Stadium en route to a 16-15 NCAA Quarterfinal win.
Hopkins got a scintillating early performance from goalie Eric Schneider, who stopped 15 of the first 25 shots he saw. Brother attackmen Shack and Wells Stanwick both finished with four goals and two assists. 
For Syracuse, Kevin Rice led the way with three goals and four assists, while Dylan Donahue and Nicky Galasso both finished with three goals and two assists. Face-off specialist Ben Williams won 24-30 draws and picked up 10 groundballs. 
It was a heavyweight fight befitting two of the game's giants. 
"What a great game for the sport of lacrosse and for the fans. It felt like old times," Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said.
The Blue Jays jumped out to a 3-1 lead, a nice cushion given the Orange's high-powered offense and Hopkins' need to settle into the game as an underdog. A see-saw battle ensued, and the Orange took its first lead with 1:07 remaining in the second quarter, carrying a 7-6 lead into the break.
Johns Hopkins capitalized on an opportunity when, tied 7-7 with 11:20 remaining in the third quarter, Jordan Evans couldn't track down a ball on the sideline and Sean Young was called for delay after swatting the ball away to prevent a quick restart. Patrick Fraser scored on the extra-man, then Shack Stanwick and Holden Cattoni stretched the lead to three.
Wells Stanwick closed the third quarter with a huge momentum play. Off an endline restart from back right with five seconds remaining, he ran right to the crease, went airborne and finished, landing — according to the referees — just outside the line. 
Read the rest HERE at InsideLacrosse

STAB stonewalls St. Christopher's to win state lacrosse title

STAB stonewalls St. Christopher's to win state lacrosse title

RICHMOND — The game was no longer in doubt — it hadn’t been for some time — but Eric Buhle was still working hard. His St. Anne’s-Belfield team led by 10 goals in the VISAA Division I state championship, and with just seconds remaining on the clock, the goalkeeper could have been forgiven for relaxing a little bit. But that wasn’t the way he was operating on Saturday.
Buhle knocked away the last shot from St. Christopher’s as the final act in a masterful performance in his final high school game. He made 14 saves in an 11-1 victory over fourth-seeded St. Christopher’s in the VISAA Division I championship Saturday afternoon at Robins Stadium at the University of Richmond.
That’s the field where he’ll be playing next year as a freshman at Richmond, and he put on a dazzling show for his future coaches.
“The defense really pulled through for me,” Buhle said. “They’ve had the best four games I’ve ever seen in these playoff games. They’ve helped me out so much.”
Fellow senior Phillip Robertson scored five goals to lead St. Anne’s (15-7), which finished off its week-long revenge tour in dominating fashion. STAB’s three state tournament opponents all beat the Saints by one goal during the regular season, with St. Chris winning 8-7 in Charlottesville on April 17.
St. Anne’s beat the other two opponents earlier in the week, defeating St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes in the quarterfinals on Tuesday and Paul VI in the semifinals on Friday night.
“I think our kids were really focused, but also realized that we were right there in the regular season and just didn’t quite make the plays,” St. Anne’s coach Bo Perriello said. “It’s nice in life when you get a chance to do it over.”
None of those saves was bigger than the one that came at the beginning of the third quarter. St. Anne’s had just gone up 5-1 on a goal from Josh Reiss, and St. Christopher’s (14-6) responded quickly, with Jacob Hale working a 1-on-1 opportunity on a breakaway. Buhle stoned him and sent the ball the other way, and St. Anne’s scored almost immediately when Jack Schultz fed Phillip Robertson with a nifty pass.
That sequence was indicative of the way things went for St. Christopher’s, which put 15 shots on frame, but couldn’t get anything past Buhle. His counterpart, Jack Gillenwater, fought gamely at the other end but couldn’t hold the line against a disciplined St. Anne’s attack.
Thomas Lynde scored the only goal for St. Chris to pull his team back to a 2-1 deficit in the first quarter. But St. Anne’s bounced right back against the St. Christopher’s zone, with Robertson working patiently and taking advantage of a missed slide to beat Gillenwater high. He added another goal off a Brodie Phillips assist on an extra-man opportunity in the final two minutes of the half, and St. Anne’s outscored St. Chris 7-0 the rest of the way.
“We tried to feed off each other and adjust on the fly to some of their schemes,” Robertson said. “…We realized that if we could make a big push in the third quarter, we could be sitting pretty good in the fourth quarter, so that’s what we tried to do.”
“We’re not a team that plays well from behind,” St. Christopher’s coach John Burke said. “So once they got a few goals’ lead on us, we had to take some chances, and that didn’t work for us.”
Schultz and Reiss had two goals each for St. Anne’s, and Phillips had a goal and two assists. Austin Park added a fourth-quarter goal to round out the scoring.

St. Christopher's falls to St. Anne's-Belfield in title game - Virginia Boys' High School Lacrosse


St. Christopher's falls to St. Anne's-Belfield in title game



One day after pulling off an emotional upset against its biggest rival to reach the state championship game, St. Christopher’s ran into a wall named Eric Buhle.
The St. Anne’s-Belfield goalkeeper and University of Richmond recruit dazzled on his future home field, making 14 saves and stopping everything St. Christopher’s threw at him in an 11-1 victory in the VISAA Division I championship game Saturday afternoon at Robins Stadium.
Fourth-seeded St. Chris (14-6) had beaten archrival Collegiate in the semifinals Friday night, ending the Cougars’ unbeaten season in the process.
“I thought that we were as ready as we could be,” St. Christopher’s coach John Burke said. “Last night was really emotionally and physically draining, so we did what we could to try to create some energy.”
None of those saves was bigger than the one that came at the beginning of the third quarter. St. Anne’s (15-7) had just gone up 5-1 on a goal from Josh Reiss, and St. Christopher’s responded quickly, with Jacob Hale working a 1-on-1 opportunity on a breakaway. Buhle stoned him and sent the ball the other way, and St. Anne’s scored almost immediately when Jack Schultz fed Phillip Robertson with a nifty pass.
That sequence was indicative of the way things went for St. Chris, which put 15 shots on frame, but couldn’t get anything past Buhle. His counterpart, Jack Gillenwater, fought gamely at the other end but couldn’t hold the line against a disciplined St. Anne’s attack.
“We’re not a team that plays well from behind,” Burke said. “So once they got a few goals’ lead on us, we had to take some chances, and that didn’t work for us.”
The only St. Christopher’s goal came late in the first quarter with St. Anne’s up 2-0. Senior midfielder Thomas Lynde worked his way from behind the net and beat Buhle with a low shot.
For sixth-seeded St. Anne’s, the game represented the final stop in a revenge tour against three teams that had beaten them by one goal in the regular season, joining quarterfinal opponent St. Stephen’s & St.
Agnes and semifinal foe Paul VI. St. Chris had beaten them 8-7 in Charlottesville on April 17.
“After such a tough road and such a tough game with them last time, we were very fortunate to be able to get our scorers going and get that kind of separation today,” St. Anne’s coach Bo Perriello said.
St. Anne’s bounced right back against the St. Christopher’s zone, with Robertson working patiently and taking advantage of a missed slide to beat Gillenwater high. He added another goal off a Brodie Phillips assist on an extra-man opportunity in the final two minutes of the half, and St. Anne’s outscored St. Chris 7-0 the rest of the way.
“The defense really pulled through for me,” Buhle said. “They’ve had the best four games I’ve ever seen in these playoff games. They’ve helped me out so much.”
The runner-up finish was the second in as many years for St. Chris, which fell to St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes in the 2014 championship.
Robertson led St. Anne’s with a game-high five goals. Schultz and Reiss added two each and Phillips added two assists.
St. Anne’s-Belfield 2 2 4 3 – 11
St. Christopher’s 1 0 0 0 – 1
Goals: STAB – P. Robertson 5, Schultz 2, Reiss 2, Phillips, Park. SC – Lynde.
Assists: STAB – Phillips 2, Schultz, J. Robertson, Marshall. C – None.
Saves: STAB – Buhle 14. SC – Gillenwater 6.
Records: St. Anne’s-Belfield 15-7; St. Christopher’s 14-6.

Monday, May 11, 2015

W&L's McCabe Chosen to Coach USILA North-South Game

W&L's McCabe Chosen to Coach USILA North-South Game

PERRY, N.Y. – The United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) has announced that Washington and Lee Head Men's Lacrosse Coach Gene McCabe has been selected to coach in the 74th United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association/LaxWorld North-South Senior All-Star Game.
McCabe will coach the south squad in the Division III game, which will be played at Cabrini College on Friday, May 22 at 3:00 pm.  The official team rosters will be announced on May 19.
The USILA North-South Senior All-Star Game started in 1940 and has been played every year except 1944 and 1945. 
McCabe is the fourth W&L mentor to coach the south squad and the first since Jim Stagnitta coached in the 1995 contest.  He guided the Generals to a 12-7 overall record in 2015, recording both his 100th win at W&L and his 150th career victory during the season.  McCabe's career record stands at 157-75 (.677), while his W&L record is 103-57 (.644) across nine seasons.
McCabe has led the Blue & White to the NCAA Tournament twice and he was named the ODAC Coach of the Year in 2009 when he led the Generals to the ODAC title.

Friday, May 8, 2015

"Lost Trophy" Documentary Set to Debut on ESPNU


"Lost Trophy" Documentary Set to Debut on ESPNU

from press release
The 1990 Syracuse men's lacrosse team is considered by many to be the best college team ever. Undefeated, owners of what would be NCAA per-game records for scoring margin (11.31 goals), average goals (20.85) and average points (33.31), winners of their third straight national title and featuring five first-team All-Americans (attackmen Greg Burns and Tom Marechek, midfielders Paul and Gary Gait and defenseman Pat McCabe), Syracuse beat Loyola 21-9 in the ’90 national championship game.
Yet this team and those legendary players won't be recognized at this year's Final Four when the NCAA typically honors the 25th Anniversary Championship Team. That's because the NCAA vacated that championship and those records, placing an asterisk next to Syracuse's title. To this day, the 1990 NCAA men's lacrosse Division I championship plaque remains missing.
Read it all HERE at Lacrosse Magazine