Monday, September 29, 2014

13 Qualities the Best Lacrosse Coaches Have in Common

13 Qualities the Best Lacrosse Coaches Have in Common
We all have “that coach” who brings back some memories from our past. For better or worse, that person left an impression on us that stuck. Do you remember your coach for positive or negative reasons?
In our current sports culture, coaches are overloaded with a multitude of stress factors. Playing time, tryouts, organization, cool uniforms (yes, some coaches stress about whether or not their team’s gear is cool) and the ultimate stress—winning—all weigh heavily on coaches’ minds. These external factors and others can cause a coach to slowly fade into the “uhhhh, that coach” memory banks of their former players.
We all agree that the last thing we want is to see a player slink into the shadows when they see us in the grocery store. What we all want be is the coach who receives a wedding invitation from a player we coached 15 years ago. Listen to legendary lacrosse coaches likeBob Scott and Richie Moran and you’ll find that they measure success in relationships every bit as much as wins.
The question then isn’t really which coach you want to be, but how do you become the coach that the kids can’t wait to spend their time with? Tons of research has been conducted on the characteristics of coaches that create positive, long-lasting memories with their athletes.
Here are 13 ways that the best coaches lead their youth athletes, from Competitive Advantage.
Read the 13 ways HERE

Monday, September 22, 2014

10 Fundamental Tips for Coaching Youth Lacrosse


10 Fundamental Tips for Coaching Youth Lacrosse
By Sara Noon at USLacrosse

Coaching a new sport can be overwhelming. As lacrosse explodes into new geographic areas and permeates the youth sports scene, the demand for qualified coaches will continue to grow. Even if you’re new to the game, you might be asked to step in and help out. While you might not be an expert on the X’s and O’s right away, there are universal coaching principles that can empower you to succeed in this role.
We’ve partnered with Dr. Richard Ginsburg, a noted sports psychologist and member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School, to present the "Top 10 Tips for Coaching Youth." Ginsburg, who also serves as a member of US Lacrosse's Sports, Science and Safety Committee, challenges coaches to examine what they love about the game and to consider what inspires them to coach. He also encourages coaches to reframe their definition of success—with outcomes ranging from winning to having fun, from skill improvement to learning sportsmanship.
Using age-appropriate methods and understanding the developmental differences in youth of various ages and gender will help you, the new (or experienced) lacrosse coach, prevent injury and promote positive cognitive and motor development.
Here are Dr. Ginsburg's 10 tips for coaching youth lacrosse players, and youth athletes in general. For more on each of these principles, check back as we discuss one per day for the next two weeks.

1. Fun is essential.

Studies have shown a strong correlation between enjoyment of the activity and participation longevity. Kids remain active in a sport if they are having fun. Performance also improves when participants enjoy playing the game. (Tuesday, Sept. 23)

2. Teach sportsmanship early.

Coaches must seize the opportunity to impart good values (integrity, respect, compassion, etc.) and to model good behavior. (Wednesday, Sept. 24)
Read all of Dr. Ginsburg's tips HERE at USLacrosse

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Persistence




Every strike brings me closer to the next home run. -Babe Ruth

Sunday, September 14, 2014

The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That's real glory. ~Vince Lombardi

Amen to this:




The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That's real glory.
~Vince Lombardi

The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That's real glory. ~Vince Lombardi

Amen to this:




The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That's real glory.
~Vince Lombardi

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Making mistakes


“A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.” ― George Bernard Shaw

Making mistakes


“A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.” ― George Bernard Shaw

Thursday, September 11, 2014

From LaxAllStars: Youth Lacrosse Problems… And Solutions


Youth Lacrosse Problems… And Solutions
By Connor Wilson in LaxAllStars
This fall we have all read a number of articles talking about youth lacrosse problems, and problems that face almost all youth sports. The specific topics covered were diverse, and the entire collection of readable material paints an interesting picture.
Sports Illustrated’s Chris Ballard wrote a piece for ExperienceLife.com about putting fun back into youth sports. US Lacrosse posted a story about the 15 keys to selecting a youth lacrosse program. Lacrosse Magazine posted an article about “taking a break to prevent injuries“. Trevor Tierney posted an article about how pursuing wins can hinder development. Even the NY Times got in on the action, and in June they published a story by David Epstein titled Sports Should Be Child’s Play.
All of these articles address youth lacrosse problems in one way or another, and all of them provide useful perspective and guidance for parents, coaches, and players. Give them a read to really get to know what’s going on out there before you continue on below to my opinions and observations on the matter.
When it comes to problems in youth lacrosse, there are many, but the majority of them have been around in one form or another for decades. So what are the major problems facing youth lacrosse?

Coaching

There are more players today than there are experienced coaches. The same is often true with referees. As our sport has grown, demand has simply outstripped supply. Good coaching is a valuable commodity, and parents and players feel the pressure to find it however they can. Sometimes this means joining an elite travel team. Sometimes it means making weekly road trips in the family car of over an hour for practice under “good coaches”. Sometimes it means giving up the sport altogether to either focus on something else or find something new and enjoyable.
youth lacrosse problems casey powell
Photo Credit: Larry Palumbo
The other major problem with coaching is “big name” vs “not big name”. People are entranced by big name players and coaches, and have been for a long time. Many of the materials that teams send out to prospective players hits on their coaching staff and its many big name players. But that doesn’t always mean great coaching. Sometimes it just means great marketing! Does the big name player coach a lot? Is this their profession? Will they be there for events? Or is their name just being used?
If a club team has 14 teams and 7 really big time coaches, are you guaranteed to get one or more of them? Or will you get a local college drop out who is just coaching for now to pay the bills? Maybe that college drop out will be a superb coach… but have you ever heard of him or her before? Could the big name be an awful coach? Could the director never show up to your child’s team’s events? It’s all possible and confusing, and a major problem.

Peer Pressure

Pressure used to occur in the form of direct head to head competition. I wanted to be better than my friend Rob, he wanted to be better than me, and we both played for the same town team, as it was our only option. Nowadays, Rob and I would still be locked in competition, but we would probably play for different club programs, and we would base a lot of our supposed success off of how good “our” program was. We no longer compare two players with peer pressure, but entire programs, their reputuations, tourney wins, famous alumni, and coaching staffs. This latter peer pressure makes everything seem bigger than it really is.
There is also pressure to play “better” competition, and not just in a league with “a couple town teams”. A town league is fine for beginners, but once your kid hits the 4th grade, it’s time for travel lacrosse! We need to travel to play the other best kids out there, right? The peer pressure of today says yes, you absolutely need to do that.
Tenacious Turtles elite youth lacrosse problems club travel team
Keeping up with the Joneses used to be about the family next door, now it’s about keeping up with any person named Jones anywhere in the country. Who cares if your kid is better than the Jones next door… there is a Jones in Oregon that is still better! That attitude is simply not healthy in my estimation, as someone out there is ALWAYS going to be better than you in some way. Why extend it so far, and at such a young age?

The Crush Of Gear

You used to sign up for youth sports and you got your uniform on the first day of practice. It was usually pretty basic (because you’re a kid), and your greatest hope was that the jersey would actually fit you. Didn’t get “your” number? Tough luck, kid. It’s just a number, and you’re 11 years old. I think you’ll be ok.
But now? Forget about it. Kids see basic uniforms, or don’t get the number they want and it’s game over. Parents can be irate that their kids are wearing mesh jerseys and don’t get team shorts. No custom helmets? Well, looks like we’re playing for someone else! Really? REALLY? Since when did youth sports become all about gear and uniforms? Why do more people ask about custom bags than ask about your development plan for their kids?
20 Years of Lacrosse Gear
(The gear in the photo above was picked up over 20 years by a pro player, Randy Fraser. I know of some 14 year old kids with an equally impressive gear collection. Is there something wrong with that? I think so!)
It’s because we are all being sold a false bill of goods. Look good, play good is the bane of my existence, and it’s totally backwards. Play good, look good is the way it used to be. Teams with ugly uniforms that won games looked good. Teams that lost games looked bad, no matter what their choice of uniform happened to be. The focus was on playing the game, not walking down a runway, turning, and sashaying away. Do I blame gear companies for this? To a certain extent, yes. But I really blame the coaches and club team organizers, because they don’t have to buy in to all that stuff.
Look at the Duke’s LC outside of Philly. No custom helmets, no custom gloves, no swag. No sublimation, no team shorts, no silly BS. They wear navy mesh reversibles that say “Duke’s” on them in white and have a number. That’s about it. Their “swag” comes from their talent. Kids want that Duke’s pinnie because it stinks of success, and not fashion. Duke’s has made their mesh pinnie cool, they aren’t cool because of their pinnie! To me, that’s an important distinction.

The Great Scholarship Lie

I still hear parents talk about lacrosse scholarships like they grow on trees. They do not. . . . 

Read the rest HERE at LaxAllStars

From LaxAllStars: Youth Lacrosse Problems… And Solutions


Youth Lacrosse Problems… And Solutions
By Connor Wilson in LaxAllStars
This fall we have all read a number of articles talking about youth lacrosse problems, and problems that face almost all youth sports. The specific topics covered were diverse, and the entire collection of readable material paints an interesting picture.
Sports Illustrated’s Chris Ballard wrote a piece for ExperienceLife.com about putting fun back into youth sports. US Lacrosse posted a story about the 15 keys to selecting a youth lacrosse program. Lacrosse Magazine posted an article about “taking a break to prevent injuries“. Trevor Tierney posted an article about how pursuing wins can hinder development. Even the NY Times got in on the action, and in June they published a story by David Epstein titled Sports Should Be Child’s Play.
All of these articles address youth lacrosse problems in one way or another, and all of them provide useful perspective and guidance for parents, coaches, and players. Give them a read to really get to know what’s going on out there before you continue on below to my opinions and observations on the matter.
When it comes to problems in youth lacrosse, there are many, but the majority of them have been around in one form or another for decades. So what are the major problems facing youth lacrosse?

Coaching

There are more players today than there are experienced coaches. The same is often true with referees. As our sport has grown, demand has simply outstripped supply. Good coaching is a valuable commodity, and parents and players feel the pressure to find it however they can. Sometimes this means joining an elite travel team. Sometimes it means making weekly road trips in the family car of over an hour for practice under “good coaches”. Sometimes it means giving up the sport altogether to either focus on something else or find something new and enjoyable.
youth lacrosse problems casey powell
Photo Credit: Larry Palumbo
The other major problem with coaching is “big name” vs “not big name”. People are entranced by big name players and coaches, and have been for a long time. Many of the materials that teams send out to prospective players hits on their coaching staff and its many big name players. But that doesn’t always mean great coaching. Sometimes it just means great marketing! Does the big name player coach a lot? Is this their profession? Will they be there for events? Or is their name just being used?
If a club team has 14 teams and 7 really big time coaches, are you guaranteed to get one or more of them? Or will you get a local college drop out who is just coaching for now to pay the bills? Maybe that college drop out will be a superb coach… but have you ever heard of him or her before? Could the big name be an awful coach? Could the director never show up to your child’s team’s events? It’s all possible and confusing, and a major problem.

Peer Pressure

Pressure used to occur in the form of direct head to head competition. I wanted to be better than my friend Rob, he wanted to be better than me, and we both played for the same town team, as it was our only option. Nowadays, Rob and I would still be locked in competition, but we would probably play for different club programs, and we would base a lot of our supposed success off of how good “our” program was. We no longer compare two players with peer pressure, but entire programs, their reputuations, tourney wins, famous alumni, and coaching staffs. This latter peer pressure makes everything seem bigger than it really is.
There is also pressure to play “better” competition, and not just in a league with “a couple town teams”. A town league is fine for beginners, but once your kid hits the 4th grade, it’s time for travel lacrosse! We need to travel to play the other best kids out there, right? The peer pressure of today says yes, you absolutely need to do that.
Tenacious Turtles elite youth lacrosse problems club travel team
Keeping up with the Joneses used to be about the family next door, now it’s about keeping up with any person named Jones anywhere in the country. Who cares if your kid is better than the Jones next door… there is a Jones in Oregon that is still better! That attitude is simply not healthy in my estimation, as someone out there is ALWAYS going to be better than you in some way. Why extend it so far, and at such a young age?

The Crush Of Gear

You used to sign up for youth sports and you got your uniform on the first day of practice. It was usually pretty basic (because you’re a kid), and your greatest hope was that the jersey would actually fit you. Didn’t get “your” number? Tough luck, kid. It’s just a number, and you’re 11 years old. I think you’ll be ok.
But now? Forget about it. Kids see basic uniforms, or don’t get the number they want and it’s game over. Parents can be irate that their kids are wearing mesh jerseys and don’t get team shorts. No custom helmets? Well, looks like we’re playing for someone else! Really? REALLY? Since when did youth sports become all about gear and uniforms? Why do more people ask about custom bags than ask about your development plan for their kids?
20 Years of Lacrosse Gear
(The gear in the photo above was picked up over 20 years by a pro player, Randy Fraser. I know of some 14 year old kids with an equally impressive gear collection. Is there something wrong with that? I think so!)
It’s because we are all being sold a false bill of goods. Look good, play good is the bane of my existence, and it’s totally backwards. Play good, look good is the way it used to be. Teams with ugly uniforms that won games looked good. Teams that lost games looked bad, no matter what their choice of uniform happened to be. The focus was on playing the game, not walking down a runway, turning, and sashaying away. Do I blame gear companies for this? To a certain extent, yes. But I really blame the coaches and club team organizers, because they don’t have to buy in to all that stuff.
Look at the Duke’s LC outside of Philly. No custom helmets, no custom gloves, no swag. No sublimation, no team shorts, no silly BS. They wear navy mesh reversibles that say “Duke’s” on them in white and have a number. That’s about it. Their “swag” comes from their talent. Kids want that Duke’s pinnie because it stinks of success, and not fashion. Duke’s has made their mesh pinnie cool, they aren’t cool because of their pinnie! To me, that’s an important distinction.

The Great Scholarship Lie

I still hear parents talk about lacrosse scholarships like they grow on trees. They do not. . . . 

Read the rest HERE at LaxAllStars

From LaxAllStars: Youth Lacrosse Problems… And Solutions


Youth Lacrosse Problems… And Solutions
By Connor Wilson in LaxAllStars
This fall we have all read a number of articles talking about youth lacrosse problems, and problems that face almost all youth sports. The specific topics covered were diverse, and the entire collection of readable material paints an interesting picture.
Sports Illustrated’s Chris Ballard wrote a piece for ExperienceLife.com about putting fun back into youth sports. US Lacrosse posted a story about the 15 keys to selecting a youth lacrosse program. Lacrosse Magazine posted an article about “taking a break to prevent injuries“. Trevor Tierney posted an article about how pursuing wins can hinder development. Even the NY Times got in on the action, and in June they published a story by David Epstein titled Sports Should Be Child’s Play.
All of these articles address youth lacrosse problems in one way or another, and all of them provide useful perspective and guidance for parents, coaches, and players. Give them a read to really get to know what’s going on out there before you continue on below to my opinions and observations on the matter.
When it comes to problems in youth lacrosse, there are many, but the majority of them have been around in one form or another for decades. So what are the major problems facing youth lacrosse?

Coaching

There are more players today than there are experienced coaches. The same is often true with referees. As our sport has grown, demand has simply outstripped supply. Good coaching is a valuable commodity, and parents and players feel the pressure to find it however they can. Sometimes this means joining an elite travel team. Sometimes it means making weekly road trips in the family car of over an hour for practice under “good coaches”. Sometimes it means giving up the sport altogether to either focus on something else or find something new and enjoyable.
youth lacrosse problems casey powell
Photo Credit: Larry Palumbo
The other major problem with coaching is “big name” vs “not big name”. People are entranced by big name players and coaches, and have been for a long time. Many of the materials that teams send out to prospective players hits on their coaching staff and its many big name players. But that doesn’t always mean great coaching. Sometimes it just means great marketing! Does the big name player coach a lot? Is this their profession? Will they be there for events? Or is their name just being used?
If a club team has 14 teams and 7 really big time coaches, are you guaranteed to get one or more of them? Or will you get a local college drop out who is just coaching for now to pay the bills? Maybe that college drop out will be a superb coach… but have you ever heard of him or her before? Could the big name be an awful coach? Could the director never show up to your child’s team’s events? It’s all possible and confusing, and a major problem.

Peer Pressure

Pressure used to occur in the form of direct head to head competition. I wanted to be better than my friend Rob, he wanted to be better than me, and we both played for the same town team, as it was our only option. Nowadays, Rob and I would still be locked in competition, but we would probably play for different club programs, and we would base a lot of our supposed success off of how good “our” program was. We no longer compare two players with peer pressure, but entire programs, their reputuations, tourney wins, famous alumni, and coaching staffs. This latter peer pressure makes everything seem bigger than it really is.
There is also pressure to play “better” competition, and not just in a league with “a couple town teams”. A town league is fine for beginners, but once your kid hits the 4th grade, it’s time for travel lacrosse! We need to travel to play the other best kids out there, right? The peer pressure of today says yes, you absolutely need to do that.
Tenacious Turtles elite youth lacrosse problems club travel team
Keeping up with the Joneses used to be about the family next door, now it’s about keeping up with any person named Jones anywhere in the country. Who cares if your kid is better than the Jones next door… there is a Jones in Oregon that is still better! That attitude is simply not healthy in my estimation, as someone out there is ALWAYS going to be better than you in some way. Why extend it so far, and at such a young age?

The Crush Of Gear

You used to sign up for youth sports and you got your uniform on the first day of practice. It was usually pretty basic (because you’re a kid), and your greatest hope was that the jersey would actually fit you. Didn’t get “your” number? Tough luck, kid. It’s just a number, and you’re 11 years old. I think you’ll be ok.
But now? Forget about it. Kids see basic uniforms, or don’t get the number they want and it’s game over. Parents can be irate that their kids are wearing mesh jerseys and don’t get team shorts. No custom helmets? Well, looks like we’re playing for someone else! Really? REALLY? Since when did youth sports become all about gear and uniforms? Why do more people ask about custom bags than ask about your development plan for their kids?
20 Years of Lacrosse Gear
(The gear in the photo above was picked up over 20 years by a pro player, Randy Fraser. I know of some 14 year old kids with an equally impressive gear collection. Is there something wrong with that? I think so!)
It’s because we are all being sold a false bill of goods. Look good, play good is the bane of my existence, and it’s totally backwards. Play good, look good is the way it used to be. Teams with ugly uniforms that won games looked good. Teams that lost games looked bad, no matter what their choice of uniform happened to be. The focus was on playing the game, not walking down a runway, turning, and sashaying away. Do I blame gear companies for this? To a certain extent, yes. But I really blame the coaches and club team organizers, because they don’t have to buy in to all that stuff.
Look at the Duke’s LC outside of Philly. No custom helmets, no custom gloves, no swag. No sublimation, no team shorts, no silly BS. They wear navy mesh reversibles that say “Duke’s” on them in white and have a number. That’s about it. Their “swag” comes from their talent. Kids want that Duke’s pinnie because it stinks of success, and not fashion. Duke’s has made their mesh pinnie cool, they aren’t cool because of their pinnie! To me, that’s an important distinction.

The Great Scholarship Lie

I still hear parents talk about lacrosse scholarships like they grow on trees. They do not. . . . 

Read the rest HERE at LaxAllStars

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Famous Failures!

Famous Failures

I love these stories!  Have courage; push beyond the initial hurdles! Be resilient!


Famous Failures!

Famous Failures

I love these stories!  Have courage; push beyond the initial hurdles! Be resilient!


Famous Failures!!

Famous Failures

I love these stories!  Have courage; push beyond the initial hurdles! Be resilient!


From LaxMagazine.com: The All-Time All-Lacrosse Football Team: Defense, Special Teams, Coach

The All-Time All-Lacrosse Football Team: Defense, Special Teams, Coach

In the spirit of multi-sport participation and the National Football League season that has once again taken the nation's attention (I've never seen Baltimore sidewalks more empty than during a Sunday afternoon Ravens game), here it is: a look the best two-sport athletes — lacrosse and football — from the last 70 or so years.
I originally conceived this idea with the intent of filling all 22 starting spots on a football team, with lacrosse players. There would be 11 starting spots on offense and 11 starting spots on defense to form the All-Time All-Lacrosse football team. But while research, suggestions from Lacrosse Magazine staff, National Lacrosse Hall of Fame archivist Joe Finn, and other sources helped uncover many names to populate nearly a full football starting lineup, there were still spots to fill mainly along the offensive line. A full team, almost.
Instead, we'll go with the whole enchilada. In two installments — offense appears here and defense, special teams and coach appears now — here is as big a list as I could produce of lacrosse players who also dabbled in professional and college football, or vice versa. Some, you'll see, dabbled in each more than others. If you have other suggestions or corrections please contact me at cmclaughlin@uslacrosse.org or on Twitter @Corey_McL.
A couple hints at the list: I would take lacrosse's defensive front seven against any team. The offense would run through Jim Brown. (Pro and college statistics below are via Pro Football-Reference and College Football Reference, and there are links below to various sources used to compile the list.)
New York Giants linebacker Mark Herzlich played attack and midfield at Conestoga (Pa.). He even had an offer to play lacrosse at Johns Hopkins. (Courtesy Herzlich family)

DEFENSE

LINEBACKERS

Mark Herzlich
Lacrosse: Conestoga (Pa.)
Football: New York Giants, Boston College
Most people know Herzlich as the inspirational figure who defeated a rare form of bone cancer to continue playing college football and eventually with the New York Giants, where he was in his third season in 2013. But before all that, he was an All-Central League lacrosse player at Conestoga (Pa.) High outside Philadelphia. He played attack and midfield, and what he called a "big righty shot," in an interview with Lacrosse Magazine. He even had an offer to play at Johns Hopkins. Herzlich's dad helped start the youth lacrosse organization in Conestoga, and Mark said he will always remain close to the sport. "I will 100 percent play lacrosse again after football is done," Herzlich told Lacrosse Magazine in 2012.
Russ Swan
Lacrosse: Yorktown (N.Y.)
Football: Virginia
Swan played lacrosse at Yorktown (N.Y.) with the fame Nelson brothers. Swan racked up 186 points in his high school career,good for 20th in Yorktown program history. He started at linebacker for four years at Virginia (1982-85), and led the team in tackles his senior season with the Cavaliers

Read the whole article HERE

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

America's First Sport: Lacrosse

The first sporting event ever observed by Europeans in North America was a lacrosse game in 1637. Jesuit missionaries from France saw hundreds of native men playing a ball game with sticks that they thought resembled a bishop's crozier, so they called the game "lacrosse."


America's First Sport: Lacrosse

The first sporting event ever observed by Europeans in North America was a lacrosse game in 1637. Jesuit missionaries from France saw hundreds of native men playing a ball game with sticks that they thought resembled a bishop's crosier, so they called the game "lacrosse."


America's First Sport: Lacrosse

The first sporting event ever observed by Europeans in North America was a lacrosse game in 1637. Jesuit missionaries from France saw hundreds of native men playing a ball game with sticks that they thought resembled a bishop's crosier, so they called the game "lacrosse."


Attacking the Goal: Great Inside Roll Clips from 2014


Attacking the Goal: Great Inside Roll Clips from 2014


Great Inside Roll Clips from 2014


Wednesday, September 3, 2014

In the NYTimes: There’s No Off in This Season: Team Sports Are Taking Over Kids’ Lives


             
         

There’s No Off in This Season: Team Sports Are Taking Over Kids’ Lives

In The New York Times

When my daughters were young, they had a book we all loved called “Jump into January.” Every month was illustrated with a search-and-find painting filled with seasonal items. August’s was “Sail into August / come along with me / That sand is soft, the sea is warm / What can you see?” Items included a sailboat, shovel, crab, hammock, surfboard and sand castle.
Have a teenager these days? You’d be lucky to see a sand castle in August. Instead, you’re probably spending most of your month schlepping to tryouts, hauling to two-a-day practices, scheduling around mandatory workouts and letting yet another extracurricular activity encroach on once-sacred family time. The youth sports juggernaut, fueled by breathless cable networks, corporate sponsors and power-hungry leagues, is gradually colonizing more and more time: weeknights, weekends, religious holidays and now vacations.
Warning: Gatorade doesn’t go with s’mores.
Recently, I spoke with the patriarch of a large family who spent a year arranging a once-in-a-lifetime vacation with his children and grandchildren. The families coordinated schedules, booked plane tickets and paid for hotels, then my friend’s 15-year-old granddaughter was told there were mandatory soccer tryouts at her Manhattan school; if she didn’t show up she wouldn’t be eligible. She skipped the trip (and still didn’t make the team).

Read it all HERE

Team sports are taking over kids lives in The New York Times

In the NYTimes: There’s No Off in This Season: Team Sports Are Taking Over Kids’ Lives


             
         

There’s No Off in This Season: Team Sports Are Taking Over Kids’ Lives

In The New York Times

When my daughters were young, they had a book we all loved called “Jump into January.” Every month was illustrated with a search-and-find painting filled with seasonal items. August’s was “Sail into August / come along with me / That sand is soft, the sea is warm / What can you see?” Items included a sailboat, shovel, crab, hammock, surfboard and sand castle.
Have a teenager these days? You’d be lucky to see a sand castle in August. Instead, you’re probably spending most of your month schlepping to tryouts, hauling to two-a-day practices, scheduling around mandatory workouts and letting yet another extracurricular activity encroach on once-sacred family time. The youth sports juggernaut, fueled by breathless cable networks, corporate sponsors and power-hungry leagues, is gradually colonizing more and more time: weeknights, weekends, religious holidays and now vacations.
Warning: Gatorade doesn’t go with s’mores.
Recently, I spoke with the patriarch of a large family who spent a year arranging a once-in-a-lifetime vacation with his children and grandchildren. The families coordinated schedules, booked plane tickets and paid for hotels, then my friend’s 15-year-old granddaughter was told there were mandatory soccer tryouts at her Manhattan school; if she didn’t show up she wouldn’t be eligible. She skipped the trip (and still didn’t make the team).

Read it all HERE

Team sports are taking over kids lives in The New York Times