Sunday, August 24, 2014

Congrats to the Denver Outlaws on their MLL Championship!





Photos from Lacrosse Magazine

Congrats to Denver Outlaws on the MLL Championship!





Congrats to Denver Outlaws on the MLL Championship!





The man who wants to make lacrosse a FIFA beater “Lacrosse is the sickest game ever.”

 The man who wants to make lacrosse a FIFA beater  “Lacrosse is the sickest game ever.”

By  Published 


"Lacrosse is the sickest sport ever." Carlo Sunseri is being neither cute nor ironic. His enthusiasm is uncomplicated. "It's down to the finesse of the game," he says. "The speed, the stick-work, the physicality: lacrosse inspires passion." Sunseri, who fell in love with lacrosse in high school and played to top college league level, is not merely passionate about the sport: he is evangelical. During his final year at the Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh he founded a video game company with a single purpose: to create lacrosse-based video games that could compete with EA's flagship sports series in terms of quality and attention to detail.
Since 2009 Sunseri has independently released no fewer than ten lacrosse titles. Most, such as those he made with the endorsement of the National Lacrosse League have been realistic in approach. Others, such as the iOS game Laxy Bro, a lacrosse-themed Flappy Bird clone, are more flippant. But Sunseri's puppy-esque energy and fervour is not without a business case, even if he has been unable to convince any major video game publisher to help develop the games. Last month his latest project, Lacrosse 15, was funded on Indiegogo for close to $150,000, more than double its goal. There is, it turns out, a paying audience to support his vision.
Lacrosse is older than football (on both sides of the Atlantic). The sport, in which two teams of ten players pass a ball using a lacrosse stick (a pole of varying lengths with a netted pouch fixed to the top end) and attempt to heft it into the opponent's goal was reputedly originated by Native Americans almost a thousand years ago. By the 17th century lacrosse was widely played across America. For a time the sport featured in the Olympics. And yet it remains a niche interest compared to the younger team games played around the world. Some even poke fun. Perhaps it's the word itself, both Gallic and feminine in its formation. Or maybe it's the fact that, on the field, lacrosse appears less physical than American Football, less plainly elegant than soccer, less brutal than hockey (whose unadorned sticks seem somehow more honest), and more complicated than all of the above.
1
Sunseri played lacrosse in the Division I college league while studying at Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh.
These are, Sunseri insists, prejudices founded on ignorance. "Lacrosse has all the best attributes of other sports games: the hitting of American football, the stick work of hockey, the passing of soccer, and the up and down action of basketball," he says. "It also translates extremely well to a video game." So well, in fact, that Sunseri believes that his game could prove instrumental in helping to popularise lacrosse. "Lacrosse is the fastest growing sport in the US," he says. "It's at a tipping point to go mainstream. I believe the video game will help to get lacrosse sticks into more people's hands. Look at what EA's FIFA did for the sport of soccer in the U.S. - That's what I want our video games to do for lacrosse.
Sunseri grew up in Mt. Lebanon, a small suburb of Pittsburgh during the early 1990s. He played America football and lacrosse through high school, but eventually dropped the former in order to more fully focus on lacrosse. Simultaneously he was fostering an interest in computers. "Our family got a desktop computer just when the internet was becoming popular," he says. "I spent tons of time on it researching video games, lacrosse, and how to start a business." Suneri's interests came together naturally. "I'd always dreamed of playing an awesome lacrosse video game that was the quality of Madden Sports," he says. "Even when we were playing the original PlayStation, I wondered why no one, EA in particular, had ever made a simulation lacrosse video game. It wasn't until college that I really thought about the possibility of making a video game when Microsoft announced XNA and the Indie Game Channel."
 Read it all HERE

The man who wants to make lacrosse a FIFA beater “Lacrosse is the sickest game ever.”

 The man who wants to make lacrosse a FIFA beater  “Lacrosse is the sickest game ever.”

By  Published 


"Lacrosse is the sickest sport ever." Carlo Sunseri is being neither cute nor ironic. His enthusiasm is uncomplicated. "It's down to the finesse of the game," he says. "The speed, the stick-work, the physicality: lacrosse inspires passion." Sunseri, who fell in love with lacrosse in high school and played to top college league level, is not merely passionate about the sport: he is evangelical. During his final year at the Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh he founded a video game company with a single purpose: to create lacrosse-based video games that could compete with EA's flagship sports series in terms of quality and attention to detail.
Since 2009 Sunseri has independently released no fewer than ten lacrosse titles. Most, such as those he made with the endorsement of the National Lacrosse League have been realistic in approach. Others, such as the iOS game Laxy Bro, a lacrosse-themed Flappy Bird clone, are more flippant. But Sunseri's puppy-esque energy and fervour is not without a business case, even if he has been unable to convince any major video game publisher to help develop the games. Last month his latest project, Lacrosse 15, was funded on Indiegogo for close to $150,000, more than double its goal. There is, it turns out, a paying audience to support his vision.
Lacrosse is older than football (on both sides of the Atlantic). The sport, in which two teams of ten players pass a ball using a lacrosse stick (a pole of varying lengths with a netted pouch fixed to the top end) and attempt to heft it into the opponent's goal was reputedly originated by Native Americans almost a thousand years ago. By the 17th century lacrosse was widely played across America. For a time the sport featured in the Olympics. And yet it remains a niche interest compared to the younger team games played around the world. Some even poke fun. Perhaps it's the word itself, both Gallic and feminine in its formation. Or maybe it's the fact that, on the field, lacrosse appears less physical than American Football, less plainly elegant than soccer, less brutal than hockey (whose unadorned sticks seem somehow more honest), and more complicated than all of the above.
1
Sunseri played lacrosse in the Division I college league while studying at Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh.
These are, Sunseri insists, prejudices founded on ignorance. "Lacrosse has all the best attributes of other sports games: the hitting of American football, the stick work of hockey, the passing of soccer, and the up and down action of basketball," he says. "It also translates extremely well to a video game." So well, in fact, that Sunseri believes that his game could prove instrumental in helping to popularise lacrosse. "Lacrosse is the fastest growing sport in the US," he says. "It's at a tipping point to go mainstream. I believe the video game will help to get lacrosse sticks into more people's hands. Look at what EA's FIFA did for the sport of soccer in the U.S. - That's what I want our video games to do for lacrosse.
Sunseri grew up in Mt. Lebanon, a small suburb of Pittsburgh during the early 1990s. He played America football and lacrosse through high school, but eventually dropped the former in order to more fully focus on lacrosse. Simultaneously he was fostering an interest in computers. "Our family got a desktop computer just when the internet was becoming popular," he says. "I spent tons of time on it researching video games, lacrosse, and how to start a business." Suneri's interests came together naturally. "I'd always dreamed of playing an awesome lacrosse video game that was the quality of Madden Sports," he says. "Even when we were playing the original PlayStation, I wondered why no one, EA in particular, had ever made a simulation lacrosse video game. It wasn't until college that I really thought about the possibility of making a video game when Microsoft announced XNA and the Indie Game Channel."
 Read it all HERE

The man who wants to make lacrosse a FIFA beater “Lacrosse is the sickest game ever.”

 The man who wants to make lacrosse a FIFA beater  “Lacrosse is the sickest game ever.”



By  Published 


"Lacrosse is the sickest sport ever." Carlo Sunseri is being neither cute nor ironic. His enthusiasm is uncomplicated. "It's down to the finesse of the game," he says. "The speed, the stick-work, the physicality: lacrosse inspires passion." Sunseri, who fell in love with lacrosse in high school and played to top college league level, is not merely passionate about the sport: he is evangelical. During his final year at the Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh he founded a video game company with a single purpose: to create lacrosse-based video games that could compete with EA's flagship sports series in terms of quality and attention to detail.
Since 2009 Sunseri has independently released no fewer than ten lacrosse titles. Most, such as those he made with the endorsement of the National Lacrosse League have been realistic in approach. Others, such as the iOS game Laxy Bro, a lacrosse-themed Flappy Bird clone, are more flippant. But Sunseri's puppy-esque energy and fervour is not without a business case, even if he has been unable to convince any major video game publisher to help develop the games. Last month his latest project, Lacrosse 15, was funded on Indiegogo for close to $150,000, more than double its goal. There is, it turns out, a paying audience to support his vision.
Lacrosse is older than football (on both sides of the Atlantic). The sport, in which two teams of ten players pass a ball using a lacrosse stick (a pole of varying lengths with a netted pouch fixed to the top end) and attempt to heft it into the opponent's goal was reputedly originated by Native Americans almost a thousand years ago. By the 17th century lacrosse was widely played across America. For a time the sport featured in the Olympics. And yet it remains a niche interest compared to the younger team games played around the world. Some even poke fun. Perhaps it's the word itself, both Gallic and feminine in its formation. Or maybe it's the fact that, on the field, lacrosse appears less physical than American Football, less plainly elegant than soccer, less brutal than hockey (whose unadorned sticks seem somehow more honest), and more complicated than all of the above.
1
Sunseri played lacrosse in the Division I college league while studying at Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh.
These are, Sunseri insists, prejudices founded on ignorance. "Lacrosse has all the best attributes of other sports games: the hitting of American football, the stick work of hockey, the passing of soccer, and the up and down action of basketball," he says. "It also translates extremely well to a video game." So well, in fact, that Sunseri believes that his game could prove instrumental in helping to popularise lacrosse. "Lacrosse is the fastest growing sport in the US," he says. "It's at a tipping point to go mainstream. I believe the video game will help to get lacrosse sticks into more people's hands. Look at what EA's FIFA did for the sport of soccer in the U.S. - That's what I want our video games to do for lacrosse.
Sunseri grew up in Mt. Lebanon, a small suburb of Pittsburgh during the early 1990s. He played America football and lacrosse through high school, but eventually dropped the former in order to more fully focus on lacrosse. Simultaneously he was fostering an interest in computers. "Our family got a desktop computer just when the internet was becoming popular," he says. "I spent tons of time on it researching video games, lacrosse, and how to start a business." Suneri's interests came together naturally. "I'd always dreamed of playing an awesome lacrosse video game that was the quality of Madden Sports," he says. "Even when we were playing the original PlayStation, I wondered why no one, EA in particular, had ever made a simulation lacrosse video game. It wasn't until college that I really thought about the possibility of making a video game when Microsoft announced XNA and the Indie Game Channel."
 Read it all HERE

Friday, August 15, 2014

New Men's NCAA Lacrosse rules recommended

From InsideLacrosse.com

My own view is that I would have liked to see more rule changes related to the shot clock.  I don't like the arbitrariness that the refs use before initiating the "stall call."

Well-worth a read and more conversation!

Coach Carey


Rules Committee Recommends Visual Clock Added to Current Stall Procedure; Face-Off Changes

The NCAA Rules Committee unveiled its rule change recommendations following its meeting in Indianapolis. The committee chose not to require a shot clock on every possession, instead tweaking the current stall procedure by requiring a visible clock. Also, the committee recommended a change to face-off procedure in which players can not pick up the ball in the back of their sticks.
The full release from NCAA.com is below:
Men’s lacrosse committee recommends altering stall procedures, faceoffsThe NCAA Men’s Lacrosse Rules Committee recommended several changes to its stalling rules and faceoff tactics Thursday.
The committee, which met Aug. 12-14 in Indianapolis, recommended a visible clock be used to time the 30-second stalling segment in facilities capable of displaying the clocks. That change would take effect in spring 2015.
It also recommended that two clocks be used at either end of the field; the use of one clock, however, will still be allowed. When one clock is used, it should be located midfield opposite the benches and elevated if possible, the committee recommends.
All Division I men’s lacrosse programs will be required to have the clocks displayed by the 2016 season, and Division II and Division III will be required to have visible clocks by the 2017 season.
All rules proposals must be approved by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel, which will discuss the men’s lacrosse rules proposals Sept. 10.
If the proposals are approved and a facility is not capable of displaying a separate clock or clocks when a stall warning is called, officials will use the game clock to manage the 30-second countdown for the offensive team to take a shot on goal.
If the offense does not take a shot on goal before the 30-second countdown expires, officials will award possession to the other team. If the committee’s recommendation is approved, officials would no longer use a 20-second timer and make a hand count in the final 10 seconds of the stall procedure. Additionally, the 30-second period would start and stop in sync with the game clock.
“A visible clock will enable everyone to see the start and stop of the clock when stalling is called,” said Jon Hind, committee chair and director of athletics at Hamilton College in New York. “We continue to refine and improve the methods used to deter teams from stalling.”
Shot clock discussionCommittee members also discussed the possibility of recommending a shot clock on every possession throughout the game.
The committee broke into small groups and reviewed potential impacts on the game. Ultimately, the committee did not support using a shot clock on every possession because of the following concerns:
• The impact on pace of play: The committee believes shot clocks on every possession could lead to more deliberate play and longer possessions.
• Defensive approach: The committee believes shot clocks on every possession would lead to more frequent use of zone defenses, which would considerably impact pace of play.
• Substitutions: Committee members were concerned teams might be more deliberate with substitutions and hold the ball until the last few segments of a shot clock.
• Style of Play: A significantly positive aspect of NCAA men’s lacrosse is the variety of approaches to style of play. Committee members expressed concern that this creativity and unpredictability would be reduced with a shot clock.
• Data: In reviewing available data, stall procedure calls occur roughly two times per game. Changing to a shot clock on every possession would significantly alter  the game.
FaceoffsThe committee also recommended tweaks to the lacrosse faceoff rules.
Under the proposal, a violation would be called if a player picks up or carries the ball on the back of his stick. It would still be legal to clamp the ball with the back of the stick, but the ball must be moved, raked or directed immediately.
“Picking up and carrying the ball on the back of the stick is contrary to the intent of the faceoff,” Hind said. “Faceoffs continue to be an important part of the game, but the committee feels that some of the current tactics being used are contrary to the spirit of the rule.”
It would also be illegal to use a body part (forearm, elbow, head, etc.) to initiate contact with an opponent’s stick. It remains illegal to kick or step on an opponent’s stick.
If the faceoff changes are approved, the protocol will also change slightly to the following process:
1 -- The official will direct the players to come together and put their sticks on the ground opposite each other;
2 -- The official will place the ball on the ground and say “set”; and
3 -- The official will step away and blow the whistle to start play.
TimeoutsCommittee members recommended a small change to dead ball timeouts in which the restart will be in the field of play. In these instances, only the team in possession or entitled to possession is allowed to call timeout.
“The committee feels it is important to give the offense the opportunity to create transitional play,” Hind said.
Either team may continue to call timeout during all other dead ball situations.
Other recommendations• Change to allowing goals/stall procedure to be satisfied on the release of the ball instead of the ball crossing the plane of the goal line.
• In plays around the crease, if a player releases the ball before landing in the crease, the goal shall count, provided his feet are grounded.
• When the ball returns to the defensive half after the offensive team has cleared the ball (other than a deflection or rebounded shot), this will result in a turnover and quick restart instead of a stall procedure or clearing clock. Defensive players may bat the ball to keep it in the offensive half, but if a defender possesses the ball from the defensive half, it is a violation.
• By the 2016 season, all uniform numbers must clearly contrast the color of the uniform. A white or light-colored uniform must have dark colored numbers; a dark-colored uniform must have light-colored number.
• Bob Scalise, athletics director at Harvard University, was recommended as the new chair of the committee. 

New Men's NCAA Lacrosse rules recommended

From InsideLacrosse.com

My own view is that I would have liked to see more rule changes related to the shot clock.  I don't like the arbitrariness that the refs use before initiating the "stall call."

Well-worth a read and more conversation!

Coach Carey


Rules Committee Recommends Visual Clock Added to Current Stall Procedure; Face-Off Changes

The NCAA Rules Committee unveiled its rule change recommendations following its meeting in Indianapolis. The committee chose not to require a shot clock on every possession, instead tweaking the current stall procedure by requiring a visible clock. Also, the committee recommended a change to face-off procedure in which players can not pick up the ball in the back of their sticks.
The full release from NCAA.com is below:
Men’s lacrosse committee recommends altering stall procedures, faceoffsThe NCAA Men’s Lacrosse Rules Committee recommended several changes to its stalling rules and faceoff tactics Thursday.
The committee, which met Aug. 12-14 in Indianapolis, recommended a visible clock be used to time the 30-second stalling segment in facilities capable of displaying the clocks. That change would take effect in spring 2015.
It also recommended that two clocks be used at either end of the field; the use of one clock, however, will still be allowed. When one clock is used, it should be located midfield opposite the benches and elevated if possible, the committee recommends.
All Division I men’s lacrosse programs will be required to have the clocks displayed by the 2016 season, and Division II and Division III will be required to have visible clocks by the 2017 season.
All rules proposals must be approved by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel, which will discuss the men’s lacrosse rules proposals Sept. 10.
If the proposals are approved and a facility is not capable of displaying a separate clock or clocks when a stall warning is called, officials will use the game clock to manage the 30-second countdown for the offensive team to take a shot on goal.
If the offense does not take a shot on goal before the 30-second countdown expires, officials will award possession to the other team. If the committee’s recommendation is approved, officials would no longer use a 20-second timer and make a hand count in the final 10 seconds of the stall procedure. Additionally, the 30-second period would start and stop in sync with the game clock.
“A visible clock will enable everyone to see the start and stop of the clock when stalling is called,” said Jon Hind, committee chair and director of athletics at Hamilton College in New York. “We continue to refine and improve the methods used to deter teams from stalling.”
Shot clock discussionCommittee members also discussed the possibility of recommending a shot clock on every possession throughout the game.
The committee broke into small groups and reviewed potential impacts on the game. Ultimately, the committee did not support using a shot clock on every possession because of the following concerns:
• The impact on pace of play: The committee believes shot clocks on every possession could lead to more deliberate play and longer possessions.
• Defensive approach: The committee believes shot clocks on every possession would lead to more frequent use of zone defenses, which would considerably impact pace of play.
• Substitutions: Committee members were concerned teams might be more deliberate with substitutions and hold the ball until the last few segments of a shot clock.
• Style of Play: A significantly positive aspect of NCAA men’s lacrosse is the variety of approaches to style of play. Committee members expressed concern that this creativity and unpredictability would be reduced with a shot clock.
• Data: In reviewing available data, stall procedure calls occur roughly two times per game. Changing to a shot clock on every possession would significantly alter  the game.
FaceoffsThe committee also recommended tweaks to the lacrosse faceoff rules.
Under the proposal, a violation would be called if a player picks up or carries the ball on the back of his stick. It would still be legal to clamp the ball with the back of the stick, but the ball must be moved, raked or directed immediately.
“Picking up and carrying the ball on the back of the stick is contrary to the intent of the faceoff,” Hind said. “Faceoffs continue to be an important part of the game, but the committee feels that some of the current tactics being used are contrary to the spirit of the rule.”
It would also be illegal to use a body part (forearm, elbow, head, etc.) to initiate contact with an opponent’s stick. It remains illegal to kick or step on an opponent’s stick.
If the faceoff changes are approved, the protocol will also change slightly to the following process:
1 -- The official will direct the players to come together and put their sticks on the ground opposite each other;
2 -- The official will place the ball on the ground and say “set”; and
3 -- The official will step away and blow the whistle to start play.
TimeoutsCommittee members recommended a small change to dead ball timeouts in which the restart will be in the field of play. In these instances, only the team in possession or entitled to possession is allowed to call timeout.
“The committee feels it is important to give the offense the opportunity to create transitional play,” Hind said.
Either team may continue to call timeout during all other dead ball situations.
Other recommendations• Change to allowing goals/stall procedure to be satisfied on the release of the ball instead of the ball crossing the plane of the goal line.
• In plays around the crease, if a player releases the ball before landing in the crease, the goal shall count, provided his feet are grounded.
• When the ball returns to the defensive half after the offensive team has cleared the ball (other than a deflection or rebounded shot), this will result in a turnover and quick restart instead of a stall procedure or clearing clock. Defensive players may bat the ball to keep it in the offensive half, but if a defender possesses the ball from the defensive half, it is a violation.
• By the 2016 season, all uniform numbers must clearly contrast the color of the uniform. A white or light-colored uniform must have dark colored numbers; a dark-colored uniform must have light-colored number.
• Bob Scalise, athletics director at Harvard University, was recommended as the new chair of the committee.