Friday, February 28, 2014

Four UVA Men's Lacrosse players on the Tewaaraton Watch List


Four UVA Men's Lacrosse players on the Tewaaraton Watch List

#41 Mark Cockerton



#44 Chris LaPierre


#27 Scott McWilliams



#24 Rob Emery

Four UVA Men's Lacrosse players on the Tewaaraton Watch List


Four UVA Men's Lacrosse players on the Tewaaraton Watch List

#41 Mark Cockerton



#44 Chris LaPierre


#27 Scott McWilliams



#24 Rob Emery

Four UVA Men's Lacrosse players on the Tewaaraton Watch List


Four UVA Men's Lacrosse players on the Tewaaraton Watch List

#41 Mark Cockerton



#44 Chris LaPierre


#27 Scott McWilliams



#24 Rob Emery


A wonderful article from USLacrosse, "How to ‘Coach’ Your Child from the Sideline"



How to ‘Coach’ Your Child from the Sideline

 February 24, 2014    7598 Views
  4315  615 
 
 Gordon Corsetti | @atlantayouthlax
How to coach your kid from the sideline
This is a guest post from Gordon Corsetti, a lacrosse official in the Atlanta area. Visit the Atlanta Youth Lacrosse blog for more words of wisdom from Gordon.
I like well-behaved parents, because I have been around a lot of ill-behaved ones.
In nearly every youth game that I have officiated there has been at least one—and usually more—fans screaming instructions to their player or entire team from the sideline. Often, it is incredibly poor advice. These are the same individuals who yell when their son or daughter is taken off the field, openly criticize the officials, and generally know next to nothing about how lacrosse is played.
I believe that there would be no problems on the sideline if fans approached the game with the goal of contributing to a positive sporting atmosphere. Unfortunately, there tends to be a minority of people that willfully ignore that idea, all the while believing that their yelling is somehow helping their team.
Here’s a hint: You aren’t helping.
Take, for example, the parent that yells “shoot!” when a player is twenty yards away from the goal. It accomplishes nothing more than getting the player amped up to take a shot.
My personal favorite is when the head coach is yelling “hold the ball” and all the parents are yelling “shoot!” More often than not, the player will listen to the voice of their mother or father and take an ill-advised shot. Meanwhile, their coach has his head buried in his hands, wondering if there is enough duct tape to put over the mouths of his team’s fans.
Keep this in mind: Your player recognizes your voice whenever you yell something during the game. I played in some very competitive high school games, and my father attended many of them. I could always recognize his voice from the stands.
The kicker is, he never said anything more than “Go, Gordon!” A coach with more than thirty years of experience in lacrosse, and not once did he give me advice from the sideline. He knew his role was to root for me when I did well and encourage me when things turned rough.
I was never embarrassed by my father’s comments from the sidelines. However, I have on numerous occasions been embarrassed for some of my teammates and players whose parents who thought their role was to assist the coaches from the stands.
So how do you yell when watching from the sideline? The easiest way to do this is to limit yourself to a few general phrases:
  • “Go, (insert player name here)!”
  • “Great play!”
  • “Awesome defense!”
  • “Stay strong!”
  • “Keep playing hard!”
If you limit yourself to general statements about your player and your team, you don’t run afoul of the coach trying to do his job of running the offense or defense. Also, you can never get into the problem of giving bad advice to your player at a critical moment during a game. Plus, all of those phrases are extremely positive.
Avoid yelling anything negative. Here are a few negative comments I have heard during games over the years:
  • “Put him in a body bag!” Heard this during a U11 game and was stunned speechless.
  • “Destroy him!” Would you want that yelled at your child?
  • “Wake up!” Accomplishes nothing more that getting the player nervous.
  • “That was the worst call I’ve ever seen!” Makes the head coach’s job more difficult and sets a bad example for all the players.
If what you are about to yell isn’t positive, it’s best to swallow your comment. MomsTeam.com also published a short article on why yelling at your player negatively is not the best course of action.
Lacrosse is an emotional game. I don’t expect parents and fans to be robots on the sidelines. I want people to get into the flow of the game and feel the excitement that is inherent in competitive sports.
What I don’t want is for a kid to get discouraged while playing lacrosse because someone feels it is necessary to share their opinion with everyone at the game. Enjoy the game in a positive manner or stay silent.
Finally, I leave you with these talking points for honoring the ROOTS of the game, from Positive Coaching Alliance.
Remember to honor the game with your actions anytime your team steps onto the field.
Gordon is a born lacrosse official who played for ten years before realizing he'd much rather ref the game than play it. He lives in Atlanta and officiates youth, high school, and collegiate men's lacrosse games all over the southeast. His passion is educating and training officials, coaches, players, parents and all other fans on the rules of lacrosse, the sport’s history, and how best to develop lacrosse in new areas. Contact Gordon atrules@ayllax.com.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Tewaaraton Watch Lists for 2014 Announced

Tewaaraton Watch Lists for 2014 Announced

from Press Release | Related: Handicapping the Men's Race | Women's Breakdown
Maryland's Katie Schwarzmann and Cornell's Rob Pannell took home the Tewaaraton in 2013, but both have graduated, meaning we will have first-time winners for both men and women on May 29th in Washington, D.C. (John Strohsacker/LaxPhotos.com) 
NEW YORK — The Tewaaraton Foundation has announced the 2014 Tewaaraton Award men's and women's watch lists presented by Panama Jack. The lists include the top players across all three divisions of NCAA lacrosse and highlight the early contenders for the 2014 Tewaaraton Award.
Among 2014 watch list returnees are three former finalists. On the men's side, 2013 finalists Tom Schreiber (Princeton) and Lyle Thompson (Albany) return to the watch list this year. Senior Alyssa Murray (Syracuse) returns on the women's side.
"This is meaningful acknowledgement by the coaches of the top 100 players in the college game today. As the season unfolds, we are excited to track the progress of this group and those players who inevitably emerge and are added to this list," said Jeff Harvey, chairman of the Tewaaraton Foundation. "We look forward to the season ahead and in greeting the 10 players who ultimately emerge as Tewaaraton Award finalists."
The Tewaaraton Award annually honors the top male and top female college lacrosse player in the United States. The selection committees are made up of top collegiate coaches and are appointed annually by the Tewaaraton Foundation.
Players not named to the initial list have several opportunities to play their way into a spot as the season progresses. Additions will be announced on March 20 and April 10. On April 24, the field will be narrowed to 25 men's and 25 women's nominees. Nominees can be players on the watch lists or players not on the watch lists, effectively allowing for a third round of additions for players who earn a spot. Five men's and five women's finalists will be announced on May 8 and will be invited to the May 29 ceremony in Washington.

Women's Watch List

Men's Watch List

A finalist in 2013, Albany's Lyle Thompson is joined by line-mates Miles and Ty in the first watch list for 2014.(Corey McLaughlin)
Bridget Bianco, Northwestern - Jr., G
Casey Bocklet, Virginia - Jr., A
Nikki Boltja, Louisville - Sr., A
Frankie Caridi, Stony Brook - Sr., G
Jackie Cifarelli, Ohio State - Jr., A
Devan Crimi, Adelphi - Sr., A
Taylor Cummings, Maryland - Soph., M
Taylor D'Amore, Johns Hopkins - Sr., A
Lucy Dikeou, Stanford - Soph., M
Kelsea Donnelly, Towson - Jr., G
Kelsey Duryea, Duke - Soph., G
Lucy Ferguson, Penn - Jr., G
Katie Ferris, UMass - Sr., A
Kelyn Freedman, Georgetown - Sr., M
Abbey Friend, North Carolina - Sr., A
Loren Generi, Navy - Jr., A
Erica Geremia, Cortland - Soph., A
Shannon Gilroy, Florida - Jr., A
Kristen Giovanniello, Dartmouth - Sr., G
Brooke Griffin, Maryland - Jr., A
Hannah Hook, Denver - Sr., G
April Iannetta, Hofstra - Jr., D
Lauren Kahn, UConn - Sr., M
Kelly Lechner, Penn State - Jr., M
Alyssa Leonard, Northwestern - Sr., A
Meg Markham, Penn - Jr., D
Kerrin Maurer, Duke - Jr., A
Maggie McCormick, Penn State - Jr., A
Erin McMunn, Princeton - Jr., A
Kelly McPartland, Maryland - Jr., M
Aly Messinger, North Carolina - Soph., A
Kaylin Morissette, Louisville - Soph., M
Alyssa Murray, Syracuse - Sr., A
Rachel Ozer, Stanford - Jr., A
Jessica Pandolf, Loch Haven - Jr., M
Marlee Paton, Loyola - Sr., A/M
Jill Remenapp, Denver - Jr., A
Mikaela Rix, Boston College - Jr., M
Michelle Rubino, Stony Brook - Jr., M
Sloane Serpe, North Carolina - Sr., D
Jaclyn Sileo, LIU Post - Sr., A
Covie Stanwick, Boston College - Jr., A
Morgan Stephens, Virginia - Jr., M
Barb Sullivan, Notre Dame - Jr., D
Courtney Swan, Virginia - Jr., A
Caroline Tarzian, Georgetown - Jr., A
Kayla Treanor, Syracuse - Soph., A
Taryn VanThof, Loyola - Jr., M
Taylor Virden, Duke - Sr., D
Katie Webster, Syracuse - Sr., M
Ashton Wheatley, Salisbury - Sr., G
Niko Amato, Maryland - Sr., G
Wesley Berg, Denver - Jr., A
Connor Buczek, Cornell - Jr., M
Brian Cannon, Dickinson - Sr., A
Mike Chanenchuk, Maryland - Sr., M
Mark Cockerton, Virginia - Sr., A
Thomas DeNapoli, Towson - Sr., A
David Dickson, Bucknell - Jr., A
Dylan Donahue, Syracuse - Soph., A
Matt Donovan, Cornell - Jr., A
Michael Ehrhardt, Maryland - Sr., D
Rob Emery, Virginia - Sr., M
Brian Feeney, Penn - Sr., G
Joe Fletcher, Loyola - Sr., D
Brendan Fowler, Duke - Sr., F/O
John Glesener, Army - Jr., A
Matt Harris, Syracuse - Sr., LSM
Austin Kaut, Penn State - Sr., G
Matt Kavanagh, Notre Dame - Soph., A
Jesse King, Ohio State - Jr., M
Chris LaPierre, Virginia - Sr., M
Dylan Levings, Yale - Sr., F/O
Nate Lewnes, UMBC - Soph., A
Sam Llinares, Hofstra - Soph., A
John LoCascio, Villanova - Sr., LSM/D
Zack Losco, Penn - Sr., M
Alex Love, Hobart - Sr., A
Mike MacDonald, Princeton - Jr., A
Brandon Mangan, Yale - Sr., A
Kevin Massa, Bryant - Jr., F/O
Kieran McArdle, St. John's - Sr., A
Ben McIntosh, Drexel - Sr., M
Scott McWilliams, Virginia - Sr., D
Jeremy Noble, Denver - Sr., M
Stephen O'Hara, Notre Dame - Sr., D
Matt Poillon, Lehigh - Jr., G
Kevin Rice, Syracuse - Jr., A
Joey Sankey, North Carolina - Jr., A
Bobby Schmitt, Bellarmine - Jr., LSM/D
Tom Schreiber, Princeton - Sr., M
Joe Slavik, Cortland - Sr., M
Ty Souders, Lehigh - Sr., D
Randy Staats, Syracuse - Jr., A/M
Wells Stanwick, Hopkins - Jr., A
Shane Sturgis, Penn State - Sr., A
Lyle Thompson, Albany - Jr., A
Miles Thompson, Albany - Sr., A
Ty Thompson, Albany - Sr., A
Chad Tutton, North Carolina - Jr., M
Andrew Wagner, Mercyhurst - Sr., D
Justin Ward, Loyola - Sr., A
Jordan Wolf, Duke - Sr., A
For information on attending the Tewaaraton Ceremony on May 29 in Washington, D.C., visit www.Tewaaraton.com. Like and follow the Tewaaraton Foundation on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/Tewaaraton and on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Tewaaraton.

Tewaaraton Watch Lists for 2014

Tewaaraton Watch Lists for 2014 Announced

from Press Release | Related: Handicapping the Men's Race | Women's Breakdown
Maryland's Katie Schwarzmann and Cornell's Rob Pannell took home the Tewaaraton in 2013, but both have graduated, meaning we will have first-time winners for both men and women on May 29th in Washington, D.C. (John Strohsacker/LaxPhotos.com) 
NEW YORK — The Tewaaraton Foundation has announced the 2014 Tewaaraton Award men's and women's watch lists presented by Panama Jack. The lists include the top players across all three divisions of NCAA lacrosse and highlight the early contenders for the 2014 Tewaaraton Award.
Among 2014 watch list returnees are three former finalists. On the men's side, 2013 finalists Tom Schreiber (Princeton) and Lyle Thompson (Albany) return to the watch list this year. Senior Alyssa Murray (Syracuse) returns on the women's side.
"This is meaningful acknowledgement by the coaches of the top 100 players in the college game today. As the season unfolds, we are excited to track the progress of this group and those players who inevitably emerge and are added to this list," said Jeff Harvey, chairman of the Tewaaraton Foundation. "We look forward to the season ahead and in greeting the 10 players who ultimately emerge as Tewaaraton Award finalists."
The Tewaaraton Award annually honors the top male and top female college lacrosse player in the United States. The selection committees are made up of top collegiate coaches and are appointed annually by the Tewaaraton Foundation.
Players not named to the initial list have several opportunities to play their way into a spot as the season progresses. Additions will be announced on March 20 and April 10. On April 24, the field will be narrowed to 25 men's and 25 women's nominees. Nominees can be players on the watch lists or players not on the watch lists, effectively allowing for a third round of additions for players who earn a spot. Five men's and five women's finalists will be announced on May 8 and will be invited to the May 29 ceremony in Washington.

Women's Watch List

Men's Watch List

A finalist in 2013, Albany's Lyle Thompson is joined by line-mates Miles and Ty in the first watch list for 2014.(Corey McLaughlin)
Bridget Bianco, Northwestern - Jr., G
Casey Bocklet, Virginia - Jr., A
Nikki Boltja, Louisville - Sr., A
Frankie Caridi, Stony Brook - Sr., G
Jackie Cifarelli, Ohio State - Jr., A
Devan Crimi, Adelphi - Sr., A
Taylor Cummings, Maryland - Soph., M
Taylor D'Amore, Johns Hopkins - Sr., A
Lucy Dikeou, Stanford - Soph., M
Kelsea Donnelly, Towson - Jr., G
Kelsey Duryea, Duke - Soph., G
Lucy Ferguson, Penn - Jr., G
Katie Ferris, UMass - Sr., A
Kelyn Freedman, Georgetown - Sr., M
Abbey Friend, North Carolina - Sr., A
Loren Generi, Navy - Jr., A
Erica Geremia, Cortland - Soph., A
Shannon Gilroy, Florida - Jr., A
Kristen Giovanniello, Dartmouth - Sr., G
Brooke Griffin, Maryland - Jr., A
Hannah Hook, Denver - Sr., G
April Iannetta, Hofstra - Jr., D
Lauren Kahn, UConn - Sr., M
Kelly Lechner, Penn State - Jr., M
Alyssa Leonard, Northwestern - Sr., A
Meg Markham, Penn - Jr., D
Kerrin Maurer, Duke - Jr., A
Maggie McCormick, Penn State - Jr., A
Erin McMunn, Princeton - Jr., A
Kelly McPartland, Maryland - Jr., M
Aly Messinger, North Carolina - Soph., A
Kaylin Morissette, Louisville - Soph., M
Alyssa Murray, Syracuse - Sr., A
Rachel Ozer, Stanford - Jr., A
Jessica Pandolf, Loch Haven - Jr., M
Marlee Paton, Loyola - Sr., A/M
Jill Remenapp, Denver - Jr., A
Mikaela Rix, Boston College - Jr., M
Michelle Rubino, Stony Brook - Jr., M
Sloane Serpe, North Carolina - Sr., D
Jaclyn Sileo, LIU Post - Sr., A
Covie Stanwick, Boston College - Jr., A
Morgan Stephens, Virginia - Jr., M
Barb Sullivan, Notre Dame - Jr., D
Courtney Swan, Virginia - Jr., A
Caroline Tarzian, Georgetown - Jr., A
Kayla Treanor, Syracuse - Soph., A
Taryn VanThof, Loyola - Jr., M
Taylor Virden, Duke - Sr., D
Katie Webster, Syracuse - Sr., M
Ashton Wheatley, Salisbury - Sr., G
Niko Amato, Maryland - Sr., G
Wesley Berg, Denver - Jr., A
Connor Buczek, Cornell - Jr., M
Brian Cannon, Dickinson - Sr., A
Mike Chanenchuk, Maryland - Sr., M
Mark Cockerton, Virginia - Sr., A
Thomas DeNapoli, Towson - Sr., A
David Dickson, Bucknell - Jr., A
Dylan Donahue, Syracuse - Soph., A
Matt Donovan, Cornell - Jr., A
Michael Ehrhardt, Maryland - Sr., D
Rob Emery, Virginia - Sr., M
Brian Feeney, Penn - Sr., G
Joe Fletcher, Loyola - Sr., D
Brendan Fowler, Duke - Sr., F/O
John Glesener, Army - Jr., A
Matt Harris, Syracuse - Sr., LSM
Austin Kaut, Penn State - Sr., G
Matt Kavanagh, Notre Dame - Soph., A
Jesse King, Ohio State - Jr., M
Chris LaPierre, Virginia - Sr., M
Dylan Levings, Yale - Sr., F/O
Nate Lewnes, UMBC - Soph., A
Sam Llinares, Hofstra - Soph., A
John LoCascio, Villanova - Sr., LSM/D
Zack Losco, Penn - Sr., M
Alex Love, Hobart - Sr., A
Mike MacDonald, Princeton - Jr., A
Brandon Mangan, Yale - Sr., A
Kevin Massa, Bryant - Jr., F/O
Kieran McArdle, St. John's - Sr., A
Ben McIntosh, Drexel - Sr., M
Scott McWilliams, Virginia - Sr., D
Jeremy Noble, Denver - Sr., M
Stephen O'Hara, Notre Dame - Sr., D
Matt Poillon, Lehigh - Jr., G
Kevin Rice, Syracuse - Jr., A
Joey Sankey, North Carolina - Jr., A
Bobby Schmitt, Bellarmine - Jr., LSM/D
Tom Schreiber, Princeton - Sr., M
Joe Slavik, Cortland - Sr., M
Ty Souders, Lehigh - Sr., D
Randy Staats, Syracuse - Jr., A/M
Wells Stanwick, Hopkins - Jr., A
Shane Sturgis, Penn State - Sr., A
Lyle Thompson, Albany - Jr., A
Miles Thompson, Albany - Sr., A
Ty Thompson, Albany - Sr., A
Chad Tutton, North Carolina - Jr., M
Andrew Wagner, Mercyhurst - Sr., D
Justin Ward, Loyola - Sr., A
Jordan Wolf, Duke - Sr., A
For information on attending the Tewaaraton Ceremony on May 29 in Washington, D.C., visit www.Tewaaraton.com. Like and follow the Tewaaraton Foundation on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/Tewaaraton and on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Tewaaraton.

Tewaaraton Watch Lists for 2014

Tewaaraton Watch Lists for 2014 Announced

from Press Release | Related: Handicapping the Men's Race | Women's Breakdown
Maryland's Katie Schwarzmann and Cornell's Rob Pannell took home the Tewaaraton in 2013, but both have graduated, meaning we will have first-time winners for both men and women on May 29th in Washington, D.C. (John Strohsacker/LaxPhotos.com) 
NEW YORK — The Tewaaraton Foundation has announced the 2014 Tewaaraton Award men's and women's watch lists presented by Panama Jack. The lists include the top players across all three divisions of NCAA lacrosse and highlight the early contenders for the 2014 Tewaaraton Award.
Among 2014 watch list returnees are three former finalists. On the men's side, 2013 finalists Tom Schreiber (Princeton) and Lyle Thompson (Albany) return to the watch list this year. Senior Alyssa Murray (Syracuse) returns on the women's side.
"This is meaningful acknowledgement by the coaches of the top 100 players in the college game today. As the season unfolds, we are excited to track the progress of this group and those players who inevitably emerge and are added to this list," said Jeff Harvey, chairman of the Tewaaraton Foundation. "We look forward to the season ahead and in greeting the 10 players who ultimately emerge as Tewaaraton Award finalists."
The Tewaaraton Award annually honors the top male and top female college lacrosse player in the United States. The selection committees are made up of top collegiate coaches and are appointed annually by the Tewaaraton Foundation.
Players not named to the initial list have several opportunities to play their way into a spot as the season progresses. Additions will be announced on March 20 and April 10. On April 24, the field will be narrowed to 25 men's and 25 women's nominees. Nominees can be players on the watch lists or players not on the watch lists, effectively allowing for a third round of additions for players who earn a spot. Five men's and five women's finalists will be announced on May 8 and will be invited to the May 29 ceremony in Washington.

Women's Watch List

Men's Watch List

A finalist in 2013, Albany's Lyle Thompson is joined by line-mates Miles and Ty in the first watch list for 2014.(Corey McLaughlin)
Bridget Bianco, Northwestern - Jr., G
Casey Bocklet, Virginia - Jr., A
Nikki Boltja, Louisville - Sr., A
Frankie Caridi, Stony Brook - Sr., G
Jackie Cifarelli, Ohio State - Jr., A
Devan Crimi, Adelphi - Sr., A
Taylor Cummings, Maryland - Soph., M
Taylor D'Amore, Johns Hopkins - Sr., A
Lucy Dikeou, Stanford - Soph., M
Kelsea Donnelly, Towson - Jr., G
Kelsey Duryea, Duke - Soph., G
Lucy Ferguson, Penn - Jr., G
Katie Ferris, UMass - Sr., A
Kelyn Freedman, Georgetown - Sr., M
Abbey Friend, North Carolina - Sr., A
Loren Generi, Navy - Jr., A
Erica Geremia, Cortland - Soph., A
Shannon Gilroy, Florida - Jr., A
Kristen Giovanniello, Dartmouth - Sr., G
Brooke Griffin, Maryland - Jr., A
Hannah Hook, Denver - Sr., G
April Iannetta, Hofstra - Jr., D
Lauren Kahn, UConn - Sr., M
Kelly Lechner, Penn State - Jr., M
Alyssa Leonard, Northwestern - Sr., A
Meg Markham, Penn - Jr., D
Kerrin Maurer, Duke - Jr., A
Maggie McCormick, Penn State - Jr., A
Erin McMunn, Princeton - Jr., A
Kelly McPartland, Maryland - Jr., M
Aly Messinger, North Carolina - Soph., A
Kaylin Morissette, Louisville - Soph., M
Alyssa Murray, Syracuse - Sr., A
Rachel Ozer, Stanford - Jr., A
Jessica Pandolf, Loch Haven - Jr., M
Marlee Paton, Loyola - Sr., A/M
Jill Remenapp, Denver - Jr., A
Mikaela Rix, Boston College - Jr., M
Michelle Rubino, Stony Brook - Jr., M
Sloane Serpe, North Carolina - Sr., D
Jaclyn Sileo, LIU Post - Sr., A
Covie Stanwick, Boston College - Jr., A
Morgan Stephens, Virginia - Jr., M
Barb Sullivan, Notre Dame - Jr., D
Courtney Swan, Virginia - Jr., A
Caroline Tarzian, Georgetown - Jr., A
Kayla Treanor, Syracuse - Soph., A
Taryn VanThof, Loyola - Jr., M
Taylor Virden, Duke - Sr., D
Katie Webster, Syracuse - Sr., M
Ashton Wheatley, Salisbury - Sr., G
Niko Amato, Maryland - Sr., G
Wesley Berg, Denver - Jr., A
Connor Buczek, Cornell - Jr., M
Brian Cannon, Dickinson - Sr., A
Mike Chanenchuk, Maryland - Sr., M
Mark Cockerton, Virginia - Sr., A
Thomas DeNapoli, Towson - Sr., A
David Dickson, Bucknell - Jr., A
Dylan Donahue, Syracuse - Soph., A
Matt Donovan, Cornell - Jr., A
Michael Ehrhardt, Maryland - Sr., D
Rob Emery, Virginia - Sr., M
Brian Feeney, Penn - Sr., G
Joe Fletcher, Loyola - Sr., D
Brendan Fowler, Duke - Sr., F/O
John Glesener, Army - Jr., A
Matt Harris, Syracuse - Sr., LSM
Austin Kaut, Penn State - Sr., G
Matt Kavanagh, Notre Dame - Soph., A
Jesse King, Ohio State - Jr., M
Chris LaPierre, Virginia - Sr., M
Dylan Levings, Yale - Sr., F/O
Nate Lewnes, UMBC - Soph., A
Sam Llinares, Hofstra - Soph., A
John LoCascio, Villanova - Sr., LSM/D
Zack Losco, Penn - Sr., M
Alex Love, Hobart - Sr., A
Mike MacDonald, Princeton - Jr., A
Brandon Mangan, Yale - Sr., A
Kevin Massa, Bryant - Jr., F/O
Kieran McArdle, St. John's - Sr., A
Ben McIntosh, Drexel - Sr., M
Scott McWilliams, Virginia - Sr., D
Jeremy Noble, Denver - Sr., M
Stephen O'Hara, Notre Dame - Sr., D
Matt Poillon, Lehigh - Jr., G
Kevin Rice, Syracuse - Jr., A
Joey Sankey, North Carolina - Jr., A
Bobby Schmitt, Bellarmine - Jr., LSM/D
Tom Schreiber, Princeton - Sr., M
Joe Slavik, Cortland - Sr., M
Ty Souders, Lehigh - Sr., D
Randy Staats, Syracuse - Jr., A/M
Wells Stanwick, Hopkins - Jr., A
Shane Sturgis, Penn State - Sr., A
Lyle Thompson, Albany - Jr., A
Miles Thompson, Albany - Sr., A
Ty Thompson, Albany - Sr., A
Chad Tutton, North Carolina - Jr., M
Andrew Wagner, Mercyhurst - Sr., D
Justin Ward, Loyola - Sr., A
Jordan Wolf, Duke - Sr., A
For information on attending the Tewaaraton Ceremony on May 29 in Washington, D.C., visit www.Tewaaraton.com. Like and follow the Tewaaraton Foundation on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/Tewaaraton and on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Tewaaraton.

From LaxMagazine.com: Boyle Point: The Flawed Logic in Lacrosse Specialization

Boyle Point: The Flawed Logic in Lacrosse Specialization

by Ryan Boyle | LaxMagazine.com | Twitter
Ryan Boyle's column appears monthly inLacrosse Magazine. This originally appeared in the March 2014 issue. To receive your copy, join US Lacrossetoday.
To be, or not to be a multi-sport athlete — that is the question. And one choice stands supreme.
High school students focusing exclusively on lacrosse have considerably more time to train and develop individual skills, right?
Specialists can tailor their strength and conditioning around lacrosse with explosive sprints, middle distance runs and position-specific weight training. They’ll be in the best lacrosse-specific shape of their lives, right?
Academically, single-sport student-athletes should (in theory) get better grades than their multi-sport peers.  Without the daily grind of practice, conditioning and games, they have more time for course work, standardized test preparation and out-of class tutoring, right?
They also can prioritize recruiting, attend every showcase imaginable, train specifically for these opportunities and not worry about summer or mid-fall scheduling conflicts, right?
This thinking has red alert-level flaws when you dig deeper . . .

From LaxMagazine.com: Boyle Point: The Flawed Logic in Lacrosse Specialization

Boyle Point: The Flawed Logic in Lacrosse Specialization

by Ryan Boyle | LaxMagazine.com | Twitter
Ryan Boyle's column appears monthly inLacrosse Magazine. This originally appeared in the March 2014 issue. To receive your copy, join US Lacrossetoday.
To be, or not to be a multi-sport athlete — that is the question. And one choice stands supreme.
High school students focusing exclusively on lacrosse have considerably more time to train and develop individual skills, right?
Specialists can tailor their strength and conditioning around lacrosse with explosive sprints, middle distance runs and position-specific weight training. They’ll be in the best lacrosse-specific shape of their lives, right?
Academically, single-sport student-athletes should (in theory) get better grades than their multi-sport peers.  Without the daily grind of practice, conditioning and games, they have more time for course work, standardized test preparation and out-of class tutoring, right?
They also can prioritize recruiting, attend every showcase imaginable, train specifically for these opportunities and not worry about summer or mid-fall scheduling conflicts, right?
This thinking has red alert-level flaws when you dig deeper . . .

From LaxMagazine.com: Boyle Point: The Flawed Logic in Lacrosse Specialization

Boyle Point: The Flawed Logic in Lacrosse Specialization

by Ryan Boyle | LaxMagazine.com | Twitter
Ryan Boyle's column appears monthly inLacrosse Magazine. This originally appeared in the March 2014 issue. To receive your copy, join US Lacrossetoday.
To be, or not to be a multi-sport athlete — that is the question. And one choice stands supreme.
High school students focusing exclusively on lacrosse have considerably more time to train and develop individual skills, right?
Specialists can tailor their strength and conditioning around lacrosse with explosive sprints, middle distance runs and position-specific weight training. They’ll be in the best lacrosse-specific shape of their lives, right?
Academically, single-sport student-athletes should (in theory) get better grades than their multi-sport peers.  Without the daily grind of practice, conditioning and games, they have more time for course work, standardized test preparation and out-of class tutoring, right?
They also can prioritize recruiting, attend every showcase imaginable, train specifically for these opportunities and not worry about summer or mid-fall scheduling conflicts, right?
This thinking has red alert-level flaws when you dig deeper . . .

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

How to ‘Coach’ Your Child from the Sideline from USLacrosse

How to ‘Coach’ Your Child from the Sideline
 February 24, 2014    4454 Views
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 Gordon Corsetti | @atlantayouthlax
How to coach your kid from the sideline
This is a guest post from Gordon Corsetti, a lacrosse official in the Atlanta area. Visit the Atlanta Youth Lacrosse blog for more words of wisdom from Gordon.
I like well-behaved parents, because I have been around a lot of ill-behaved ones.
In nearly every youth game that I have officiated there has been at least one—and usually more—fans screaming instructions to their player or entire team from the sideline. Often, it is incredibly poor advice. These are the same individuals who yell when their son or daughter is taken off the field, openly criticize the officials, and generally know next to nothing about how lacrosse is played.
I believe that there would be no problems on the sideline if fans approached the game with the goal of contributing to a positive sporting atmosphere. Unfortunately, there tends to be a minority of people that willfully ignore that idea, all the while believing that their yelling is somehow helping their team.
Here’s a hint: You aren’t helping.
Take, for example, the parent that yells “shoot!” when a player is twenty yards away from the goal. It accomplishes nothing more than getting the player amped up to take a shot.
My personal favorite is when the head coach is yelling “hold the ball” and all the parents are yelling “shoot!” More often than not, the player will listen to the voice of their mother or father and take an ill-advised shot. Meanwhile, their coach has his head buried in his hands, wondering if there is enough duct tape to put over the mouths of his team’s fans.
Keep this in mind: Your player recognizes your voice whenever you yell something during the game. I played in some very competitive high school games, and my father attended many of them. I could always recognize his voice from the stands.
The kicker is, he never said anything more than “Go, Gordon!” A coach with more than thirty years of experience in lacrosse, and not once did he give me advice from the sideline. He knew his role was to root for me when I did well and encourage me when things turned rough.
I was never embarrassed by my father’s comments from the sidelines. However, I have on numerous occasions been embarrassed for some of my teammates and players whose parents who thought their role was to assist the coaches from the stands.
So how do you yell when watching from the sideline? The easiest way to do this is to limit yourself to a few general phrases:
  • “Go, (insert player name here)!”
  • “Great play!”
  • “Awesome defense!”
  • “Stay strong!”
  • “Keep playing hard!”
If you limit yourself to general statements about your player and your team, you don’t run afoul of the coach trying to do his job of running the offense or defense. Also, you can never get into the problem of giving bad advice to your player at a critical moment during a game. Plus, all of those phrases are extremely positive.
Avoid yelling anything negative. Here are a few negative comments I have heard during games over the years:
  • “Put him in a body bag!” Heard this during a U11 game and was stunned speechless.
  • “Destroy him!” Would you want that yelled at your child?
  • “Wake up!” Accomplishes nothing more that getting the player nervous.
  • “That was the worst call I’ve ever seen!” Makes the head coach’s job more difficult and sets a bad example for all the players.
If what you are about to yell isn’t positive, it’s best to swallow your comment. MomsTeam.com also published a short article on why yelling at your player negatively is not the best course of action.
Lacrosse is an emotional game. I don’t expect parents and fans to be robots on the sidelines. I want people to get into the flow of the game and feel the excitement that is inherent in competitive sports.
What I don’t want is for a kid to get discouraged while playing lacrosse because someone feels it is necessary to share their opinion with everyone at the game. Enjoy the game in a positive manner or stay silent.
Finally, I leave you with these talking points for honoring the ROOTS of the game, from Positive Coaching Alliance.
Remember to honor the game with your actions anytime your team steps onto the field.
Gordon is a born lacrosse official who played for ten years before realizing he'd much rather ref the game than play it. He lives in Atlanta and officiates youth, high school, and collegiate men's lacrosse games all over the southeast. His passion is educating and training officials, coaches, players, parents and all other fans on the rules of lacrosse, the sport’s history, and how best to develop lacrosse in new areas. Contact Gordon atrules@ayllax.com.