Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Jeff White catches up with UVA's Men's Lacrosse Coach Dom Starsia



Jeff White catches up with UVA's Men's Lacrosse Coach Dom Starsia

Catching Up With Dom Starsia


VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM
CHARLOTTESVILLE -- For further proof of lacrosse's growth, check out UVa men's coach Dom Starsia's recent travel schedule. In the span of about a week, the sport took him to San Francisco, to Harlem, N.Y., and to Tulsa, Okla.
"Ten years ago, I'm not going to any of those locations," said Starsia, who's heading into his 22nd season at Virginia.
On Oct. 12, UVa scrimmaged Princeton in the fifth San Francisco Fall Lacrosse Classic. A few days later, Starsia flew to New York and attended his first meeting as a member of the executive board of Harlem Lacrosse and Leadership, whose program directors include former UVa player Wyatt Melzer.

Finally, Saturday in Tulsa, Starsia took part in a lacrosse clinic whose sponsors included the Muscogee Creek Nation, a Native American tribal group. The organizers of the clinic included Justin Giles, a Native American who played for Starsia at UVa. Among those joining Starsia at the clinic were Brett Bucktooth and Neal Powless, former college stars who have represented the Iroquois at the world championships.

"The emphasis on the Native American piece of it all was really kind of cool," Starsia said. "And then at the end, as I was getting ready to leave, they had a closing ceremony, and they wrapped me in a Native blanket that they gave me. It was very nice. People were very appreciative. It really made for a nice week, just the three trips and all the different stuff." 

Read the entire article HERE at VirginiaSports.com 

Jeff White catches up with UVA's Men's Lacrosse Coach Dom Starsia



Jeff White catches up with UVA's Men's Lacrosse Coach Dom Starsia

Catching Up With Dom Starsia


VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM
CHARLOTTESVILLE -- For further proof of lacrosse's growth, check out UVa men's coach Dom Starsia's recent travel schedule. In the span of about a week, the sport took him to San Francisco, to Harlem, N.Y., and to Tulsa, Okla.
"Ten years ago, I'm not going to any of those locations," said Starsia, who's heading into his 22nd season at Virginia.
On Oct. 12, UVa scrimmaged Princeton in the fifth San Francisco Fall Lacrosse Classic. A few days later, Starsia flew to New York and attended his first meeting as a member of the executive board of Harlem Lacrosse and Leadership, whose program directors include former UVa player Wyatt Melzer.

Finally, Saturday in Tulsa, Starsia took part in a lacrosse clinic whose sponsors included the Muscogee Creek Nation, a Native American tribal group. The organizers of the clinic included Justin Giles, a Native American who played for Starsia at UVa. Among those joining Starsia at the clinic were Brett Bucktooth and Neal Powless, former college stars who have represented the Iroquois at the world championships.

"The emphasis on the Native American piece of it all was really kind of cool," Starsia said. "And then at the end, as I was getting ready to leave, they had a closing ceremony, and they wrapped me in a Native blanket that they gave me. It was very nice. People were very appreciative. It really made for a nice week, just the three trips and all the different stuff." 

Read the entire article HERE at VirginiaSports.com 

Jeff White catches up with UVA's Men's Lacrosse Coach Dom Starsia

Jeff White catches up with UVA's Men's Lacrosse Coach Dom Starsia
Catching Up With Dom Starsia



VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM
CHARLOTTESVILLE -- For further proof of lacrosse's growth, check out UVa men's coach Dom Starsia's recent travel schedule. In the span of about a week, the sport took him to San Francisco, to Harlem, N.Y., and to Tulsa, Okla.
"Ten years ago, I'm not going to any of those locations," said Starsia, who's heading into his 22nd season at Virginia.
On Oct. 12, UVa scrimmaged Princeton in the fifth San Francisco Fall Lacrosse Classic. A few days later, Starsia flew to New York and attended his first meeting as a member of the executive board of Harlem Lacrosse and Leadership, whose program directors include former UVa player Wyatt Melzer.

Finally, Saturday in Tulsa, Starsia took part in a lacrosse clinic whose sponsors included the Muscogee Creek Nation, a Native American tribal group. The organizers of the clinic included Justin Giles, a Native American who played for Starsia at UVa. Among those joining Starsia at the clinic were Brett Bucktooth and Neal Powless, former college stars who have represented the Iroquois at the world championships.

"The emphasis on the Native American piece of it all was really kind of cool," Starsia said. "And then at the end, as I was getting ready to leave, they had a closing ceremony, and they wrapped me in a Native blanket that they gave me. It was very nice. People were very appreciative. It really made for a nice week, just the three trips and all the different stuff." 

Read the entire article HERE at VirginiaSports.com 

UVA Lacrosse Coach writes about Spreading the game of lacrosse, San Francisco, to Harlem to Tulsa


UVA Lacrosse Coach writes about Spreading the game of lacrosse, San Francisco, to Harlem to Tulsa

Dom Starsia: Spreading the Word, San Francisco to Harlem to Tulsa
Inside Lacrosse Staff - 10/23/2013
Dom Starsia
Dom Starsia addresses kids at Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership. (Photos courtesy of Virginia Athletics)
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Editor's Note: In the span of seven days, Virginia coach Dom Starsia coached his team at the San Francisco Fall Classic, visited Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership in New York City and helped run a clinic for largely Native American players in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Exclusively for Inside Lacrosse, Dom details this incredibly rare opportunity to see three crucial — and vastly different — sides to this growing sport.
Prior to our game with Cornell in the 2012 Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, I was asked to do a radio interview. When the announcer asked me to comment on the growth of lacrosse overall, I responded with, “Just the simple fact that I am standing on the field in an NFL stadium, doing a radio interview with an ESPN station in Denver before our regular-season game that will be broadcast on ESPN nationwide, speaks directly to the growth in our game.”
Two weeks ago, I found myself about to embark on a week that took that concept of growth to another level. The plans for our trip to California to play Princeton in a fifth annual San Francisco Fall Classic had proceeded smoothly in the year prior to our departure. On the Tuesday morning before our Friday flight, however, I was informed by a colleague of a recent change in NCAA legislation that prohibits any missed class time for an out-of-season practice or game. A quick call to coach Chris Bates at Princeton confirmed that both programs were now in the same legislative fix.
The presale for the event was in excess of 3,000, but in the 48 hours between Tuesday and Thursday, there was a good chance we were going to have to call and cancel. The NCAA approved a waiver Wednesday night but with the stipulation that every player needed to obtain explicit approval from a professor for any missed class time. Coach Marc Van Arsdale led the charge in getting word out to our players, who needed to find each professor for each missed class before it was too late on Thursday for us to find any alternate travel plans. The faculty were very helpful but we still left a couple of players home in Charlottesville.
No one needs to tell college coaches about the quality of lacrosse now being played in California. While the timing of our decision to participate in the San Francisco Classic was related to St. Ignatius alums Matt and Rob Emery being on our team together, it would not hurt us overall to increase our presence in this burgeoning location. This was a great eventL beautiful day, venerable Kezar Stadium as a backdrop, clinics, alumni gatherings, almost 5,000 in attendance, etc. I would certainly recommend this experience to any colleague and program offered the opportunity.
Having been born on the lower east side of Manhattan, I woke up Tuesday morning excited to catch my flight to LaGuardia. I had been asked to serve on the executive board for the Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership initiative and was looking forward to this first meeting. I did not fully appreciate the work of this organization until speaking to Wyatt Melzer, a program director and ’12 UVa Lacrosse alum. The two core values of HLL speak directly to their mission: it’s not “grow the game”, it’s “grow the child” and “no child denied” (every behaviorial issue, every special education child welcome).
Read the rest HERE at InsideLacrosse.com

UVA Lacrosse Coach writes about Spreading the game of lacrosse, San Francisco, to Harlem to Tulsa


UVA Lacrosse Coach writes about Spreading the game of lacrosse, San Francisco, to Harlem to Tulsa

Dom Starsia: Spreading the Word, San Francisco to Harlem to Tulsa
Inside Lacrosse Staff - 10/23/2013
Dom Starsia
Dom Starsia addresses kids at Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership. (Photos courtesy of Virginia Athletics)
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Editor's Note: In the span of seven days, Virginia coach Dom Starsia coached his team at the San Francisco Fall Classic, visited Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership in New York City and helped run a clinic for largely Native American players in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Exclusively for Inside Lacrosse, Dom details this incredibly rare opportunity to see three crucial — and vastly different — sides to this growing sport.
Prior to our game with Cornell in the 2012 Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, I was asked to do a radio interview. When the announcer asked me to comment on the growth of lacrosse overall, I responded with, “Just the simple fact that I am standing on the field in an NFL stadium, doing a radio interview with an ESPN station in Denver before our regular-season game that will be broadcast on ESPN nationwide, speaks directly to the growth in our game.”
Two weeks ago, I found myself about to embark on a week that took that concept of growth to another level. The plans for our trip to California to play Princeton in a fifth annual San Francisco Fall Classic had proceeded smoothly in the year prior to our departure. On the Tuesday morning before our Friday flight, however, I was informed by a colleague of a recent change in NCAA legislation that prohibits any missed class time for an out-of-season practice or game. A quick call to coach Chris Bates at Princeton confirmed that both programs were now in the same legislative fix.
The presale for the event was in excess of 3,000, but in the 48 hours between Tuesday and Thursday, there was a good chance we were going to have to call and cancel. The NCAA approved a waiver Wednesday night but with the stipulation that every player needed to obtain explicit approval from a professor for any missed class time. Coach Marc Van Arsdale led the charge in getting word out to our players, who needed to find each professor for each missed class before it was too late on Thursday for us to find any alternate travel plans. The faculty were very helpful but we still left a couple of players home in Charlottesville.
No one needs to tell college coaches about the quality of lacrosse now being played in California. While the timing of our decision to participate in the San Francisco Classic was related to St. Ignatius alums Matt and Rob Emery being on our team together, it would not hurt us overall to increase our presence in this burgeoning location. This was a great eventL beautiful day, venerable Kezar Stadium as a backdrop, clinics, alumni gatherings, almost 5,000 in attendance, etc. I would certainly recommend this experience to any colleague and program offered the opportunity.
Having been born on the lower east side of Manhattan, I woke up Tuesday morning excited to catch my flight to LaGuardia. I had been asked to serve on the executive board for the Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership initiative and was looking forward to this first meeting. I did not fully appreciate the work of this organization until speaking to Wyatt Melzer, a program director and ’12 UVa Lacrosse alum. The two core values of HLL speak directly to their mission: it’s not “grow the game”, it’s “grow the child” and “no child denied” (every behaviorial issue, every special education child welcome).
Read the rest HERE at InsideLacrosse.com

UVA Lacrosse Coach writes about Spreading the game of lacrosse, San Francisco, to Harlem to Tulsa

UVA Lacrosse Coach writes about Spreading the game of lacrosse, San Francisco, to Harlem to Tulsa

Dom Starsia: Spreading the Word, San Francisco to Harlem to Tulsa
Inside Lacrosse Staff - 10/23/2013
Dom Starsia
Dom Starsia addresses kids at Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership. (Photos courtesy of Virginia Athletics)
  •  
  • (1/4)
  •  
Text Size
Email
   
Editor's Note: In the span of seven days, Virginia coach Dom Starsia coached his team at the San Francisco Fall Classic, visited Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership in New York City and helped run a clinic for largely Native American players in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Exclusively for Inside Lacrosse, Dom details this incredibly rare opportunity to see three crucial — and vastly different — sides to this growing sport.
Prior to our game with Cornell in the 2012 Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, I was asked to do a radio interview. When the announcer asked me to comment on the growth of lacrosse overall, I responded with, “Just the simple fact that I am standing on the field in an NFL stadium, doing a radio interview with an ESPN station in Denver before our regular-season game that will be broadcast on ESPN nationwide, speaks directly to the growth in our game.”
Two weeks ago, I found myself about to embark on a week that took that concept of growth to another level. The plans for our trip to California to play Princeton in a fifth annual San Francisco Fall Classic had proceeded smoothly in the year prior to our departure. On the Tuesday morning before our Friday flight, however, I was informed by a colleague of a recent change in NCAA legislation that prohibits any missed class time for an out-of-season practice or game. A quick call to coach Chris Bates at Princeton confirmed that both programs were now in the same legislative fix.
The presale for the event was in excess of 3,000, but in the 48 hours between Tuesday and Thursday, there was a good chance we were going to have to call and cancel. The NCAA approved a waiver Wednesday night but with the stipulation that every player needed to obtain explicit approval from a professor for any missed class time. Coach Marc Van Arsdale led the charge in getting word out to our players, who needed to find each professor for each missed class before it was too late on Thursday for us to find any alternate travel plans. The faculty were very helpful but we still left a couple of players home in Charlottesville.
No one needs to tell college coaches about the quality of lacrosse now being played in California. While the timing of our decision to participate in the San Francisco Classic was related to St. Ignatius alums Matt and Rob Emery being on our team together, it would not hurt us overall to increase our presence in this burgeoning location. This was a great eventL beautiful day, venerable Kezar Stadium as a backdrop, clinics, alumni gatherings, almost 5,000 in attendance, etc. I would certainly recommend this experience to any colleague and program offered the opportunity.
Having been born on the lower east side of Manhattan, I woke up Tuesday morning excited to catch my flight to LaGuardia. I had been asked to serve on the executive board for the Harlem Lacrosse & Leadership initiative and was looking forward to this first meeting. I did not fully appreciate the work of this organization until speaking to Wyatt Melzer, a program director and ’12 UVa Lacrosse alum. The two core values of HLL speak directly to their mission: it’s not “grow the game”, it’s “grow the child” and “no child denied” (every behaviorial issue, every special education child welcome).
Read the rest HERE at InsideLacrosse.com

Monday, October 21, 2013

Notre Dame Lacrosse using "Canadian" Style to train for 2014 Season


From Lacrosse Magazine online:



"[We want to] get a better appreciation for guys playing in space and guys playing in tight quarters as you see the influence of, call it box, call it Canadians, guys who bring a different skill set. We’re trying to incorporate that into our practices and preparation, both to become better at it ourselves and become better defending it.”

-Notre Dame coach Kevin Corrigan on his team's increasing use of the 'Canadian' style of lacrosse. Will the embrace of the box influences lead the Irish to the top? Corey McLaughlin examines in today's #30in30 -- http://laxmag.us/19WAtch

Notre Dame using "Canadian" style of lacrosse


From Lacrosse Magazine online:



"[We want to] get a better appreciation for guys playing in space and guys playing in tight quarters as you see the influence of, call it box, call it Canadians, guys who bring a different skill set. We’re trying to incorporate that into our practices and preparation, both to become better at it ourselves and become better defending it.”

-Notre Dame coach Kevin Corrigan on his team's increasing use of the 'Canadian' style of lacrosse. Will the embrace of the box influences lead the Irish to the top? Corey McLaughlin examines in today's #30in30 -- http://laxmag.us/19WAtch

Notre Dame using "Canadian" style of lacrosse


From Lacrosse Magazine online:



"[We want to] get a better appreciation for guys playing in space and guys playing in tight quarters as you see the influence of, call it box, call it Canadians, guys who bring a different skill set. We’re trying to incorporate that into our practices and preparation, both to become better at it ourselves and become better defending it.”

-Notre Dame coach Kevin Corrigan on his team's increasing use of the 'Canadian' style of lacrosse. Will the embrace of the box influences lead the Irish to the top? Corey McLaughlin examines in today's #30in30 -- http://laxmag.us/19WAtch

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Brian and Dunn: Teammates, Friends and Foes

Brian and Dunn: Teammates, Friends and Foes

On Oct. 20, in a first for the U.S. WNT, UVA midfielder Morgan Brian and UNC defender Crystal Dunn will suit up for the National Team on the same day their college teams square off. The teammates on the USA's 2012 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup championship team talk about answering the call for their country and decide to resolve the rivalry themselves. Or not.

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More info: http://www.ussoccer.com

Brian and Dunn: Teammates, Friends and Foes

Brian and Dunn: Teammates, Friends and Foes

On Oct. 20, in a first for the U.S. WNT, UVA midfielder Morgan Brian and UNC defender Crystal Dunn will suit up for the National Team on the same day their college teams square off. The teammates on the USA's 2012 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup championship team talk about answering the call for their country and decide to resolve the rivalry themselves. Or not.

<object width="960" height="720"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/JZYVu9i5cl0?hl=en_US&amp;version=3"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/JZYVu9i5cl0?hl=en_US&amp;version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="960" height="720" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

More info: http://www.ussoccer.com

Brian and Dunn: Teammates, Friends and Foes

Brian and Dunn: Teammates, Friends and Foes

On Oct. 20, in a first for the U.S. WNT, UVA midfielder Morgan Brian and UNC defender Crystal Dunn will suit up for the National Team on the same day their college teams square off. The teammates on the USA's 2012 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup championship team talk about answering the call for their country and decide to resolve the rivalry themselves. Or not.



More info: http://www.ussoccer.com

Saturday, October 19, 2013

UVM - University of Vermont's Lacrosse Team helps at a Vermont Farm



UVM - University of Vermont's Lacrosse Team helps at a Vermont Farm

The entire men's lacrosse team spent a perfect fall morning on Isham Farm in Williston, Vermont helping the Isham family with their fall chores. The farm has been in Farmer Mike's family for over five generations and it was an honor to help them out today. The guys and coaching staff built a store fire pit, helped close up their greenhouse, stacked 4 cords of wood (enough to heat the farmhouse for the entire winter), moved a tank and evaporator for sugaring, cut blackberries and removed posts/wire, pruned raspberries, forked wood chips, picked and weeded raspberries and moved landscaped boulders. The guys had a great time and really enjoyed hearing Farmer Mike's stories.

— Team Building At Isham Farm, Williston, Vermont 

UVM - University of Vermont's Lacrosse Team helps at a Vermont Farm



UVM - University of Vermont's Lacrosse Team helps at a Vermont Farm

The entire men's lacrosse team spent a perfect fall morning on Isham Farm in Williston, Vermont helping the Isham family with their fall chores. The farm has been in Farmer Mike's family for over five generations and it was an honor to help them out today. The guys and coaching staff built a store fire pit, helped close up their greenhouse, stacked 4 cords of wood (enough to heat the farmhouse for the entire winter), moved a tank and evaporator for sugaring, cut blackberries and removed posts/wire, pruned raspberries, forked wood chips, picked and weeded raspberries and moved landscaped boulders. The guys had a great time and really enjoyed hearing Farmer Mike's stories.

— Team Building At Isham Farm, Williston, Vermont 

Bates College's kicker loves his work!



"The most special thing about being a kicker is that it’s not really a position that’s too valued during practice, but during the games it can come down to one or three points, and everyone’s hoping that you can make that point. When it comes down to the wire, I want to be that person. When the pressure’s on, I enjoy having it on my shoulders. I just love going out with my team on Saturdays and getting the job done. What it comes down to is what I do on the field applies to what I do in the classroom. I’m more focused on what’s going on around me. Kicking and real life are very similar to me. I have a good time doing both."

— Kicker and religious studies major Charlie Donahue ’14, of Plymouth, N.H., during varsity football practice on Garcelon Field

(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)