Thursday, December 13, 2012

‘If you want lacrosse, you come to Onondaga’: Administrator unites Onondaga Nation, SU with lacrosse movie


Neal Powless, assistant director of the Native Student Program at SU who is also affiliated with the Onondaga Nation, decided to work on the ‘Crooked Arrows’ movie in hopes of correcting stereotypes.
Luke Rafferty | Design Editor
Neal Powless, assistant director of the Native Student Program at SU who is also affiliated with the Onondaga Nation, decided to work on the ‘Crooked Arrows’ movie in hopes of correcting stereotypes.
NEWS

‘If you want lacrosse, you come to Onondaga’: Administrator unites Onondaga Nation, SU with lacrosse movie

Published December 6, 2012 at 5:49 am
Neal Powless was born with a purpose: to be heard.
His Native American name translates to “his voice is heard among the people,” a phrase that has defined his life.
Months ago, he came across the opportunity to work on the Native American lacrosse movie “Crooked Arrows,” which was rumored to be riddled with cultural inaccuracies.
When he got the job offer, he wasn’t sure what to do. Powless is affiliated with the Onondaga Nation and is also the assistant director of the Native Student Program at Syracuse University. If Powless signed on, he worried it would hurt his own reputation with those organizations.
But Powless felt it was his duty to spread the correct message about Native American culture, so he signed on.
Powless grew up on the Onondaga Reservation, where he said, “lacrosse is part of our heritage and our culture.”
He played professionally for six seasons, was a three-time All-American and played in the World Lacrosse Championships in 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2004 for the Iroquois team.
But lacrosse is far more than a sport in Native American culture. It’s a “medicine game,” or a spiritual healing game, and is still played in this tradition every year on the reservation.
“In this area, it’s very important to our identity and who we are,” Powless said. “It’s another way of sharing our culture.”
Though different versions of the game have been played throughout Native American history, the field version that’s now played internationally originated with the Iroquois people.
So, when filmmakers looking to create a Native American lacrosse movie had trouble with their audition process, they went back to lacrosse’s Onondagan roots.
That’s where they found Powless. Producers arrived at a lacrosse practice at the Onondaga Nation Arena and started talking to Powless on the sidelines. He gave them tips about lacrosse from a Native American perspective and also suggested players to keep an eye on.
“I was pointing out guys that not only had the skill, had the look with the long hair and the braids, but also understood the culture and heritage of what the sport meant,” Powless said. “Sure enough, these guys ended up with speaking roles.”
After helping find actors, Powless was offered a job with the movie. But before getting involved, he decided that the script needed to be rewritten, to protect both himself and the actors he helped to recruit.
“I couldn’t send them out to do the things they were expecting them to do for the movie,” Powless said. “They wouldn’t have been allowed to come home if their people saw the movie. They would’ve been embarrassed.”
At the time, Powless had just signed his contract to start his current position at SU. He hadn’t even moved everything into his office yet. This meant he had the time to rewrite the script. But it also meant he had more on the line.
“It was a big jump because I knew what was at stake,” Powless said. “I went in with both feet and I had to make sure that I committed to it. I did everything I possibly could to make sure that the end product was respectful, yet entertaining.
Ira Huff, a senior English and textual studies major and Tonawanda Seneca Nation lacrosse player, said he appreciated what the movie did to put the Native American image in a good light.
“Because you can only do cowboys and Indians so much,” he said.
Huff said he thinks the movie did what it could, but he doesn’t think the way to bridge the gap between Native Americans and others in the campus community is through a movie.
“There has to be dialogue,” Huff said. “We live so close together, we live amongst one another, but that kind of openness hasn’t really come about.”
Huff is a part of the Native American Students at Syracuse, which he said tries to raise visibility and get involved in the campus community.
“We have our challenges because not everyone’s willing to listen,” he said. “Or not everyone even knows we exist.”
Powless said though “Crooked Arrows” is still about two-thirds reality and one-third Hollywood, there are subtle things in the movie that make it so even Native American people can learn a little bit as they watch it.
He said some Onondaga parents have told him their children have watched the movie upward of 30 times, reciting it word for word, which magnifies the importance of the movie’s lessons.
“It’s these little things that are subliminal that are in this movie,” Powless said. “These kids are going to end up thinking about college and educating themselves and moving forward.”
Tyler Hill, a lifelong Onondaga lacrosse player who played Silverfoot in “Crooked Arrows,” said he appreciated the opportunity this movie gave him to serve as a good role model for those children.
“That’s who the movie really was made for anyways; the kids, our future players,” Hill said. “That’s just a really good feeling to know that you’re somebody’s role model.”
He has visited many different Native American communities and said that everywhere he goes, people and their children tell him they loved the movie.
“I knew no matter what this movie was going to be a positive thing for our people,” Hill said. “So I was just happy and grateful to be a part of it, to spread the game of lacrosse and make a difference in the youth.”
Hill and Powless are both striving for this idea of spreading the message and making changes for the future. For Powless, confirmation of his cause came in the form of an email from a mother thanking him for the opportunity the movie gave her daughter.
The girl was only about 13. Her mother and grandmother found out that she had been telling people she was Italian because she was ashamed of her Native American heritage.
When “Crooked Arrows” needed Native American extras, they sent her on the bus without telling her what the movie was for.
She stepped off the bus, surrounded by countless Native American extras, actors and a Native American co-producer. They were all proud to be Native American, all happy to be there and be playing the Native American role in this movie, Powless said.
At the end of the 12 hours on set, she walked through her front door, turned to her mother and grandmother and said: “‘I’ll never say that I’m Italian again.’”
“Why wouldn’t I get involved in this movie?” Powless said. “To have an opportunity to do that, for someone to be proud of who they are, that’s why I do what I do.”

‘If you want lacrosse, you come to Onondaga’: Administrator unites Onondaga Nation, SU with lacrosse movie


Neal Powless, assistant director of the Native Student Program at SU who is also affiliated with the Onondaga Nation, decided to work on the ‘Crooked Arrows’ movie in hopes of correcting stereotypes.
Luke Rafferty | Design Editor
Neal Powless, assistant director of the Native Student Program at SU who is also affiliated with the Onondaga Nation, decided to work on the ‘Crooked Arrows’ movie in hopes of correcting stereotypes.
NEWS

‘If you want lacrosse, you come to Onondaga’: Administrator unites Onondaga Nation, SU with lacrosse movie

Published December 6, 2012 at 5:49 am
Neal Powless was born with a purpose: to be heard.
His Native American name translates to “his voice is heard among the people,” a phrase that has defined his life.
Months ago, he came across the opportunity to work on the Native American lacrosse movie “Crooked Arrows,” which was rumored to be riddled with cultural inaccuracies.
When he got the job offer, he wasn’t sure what to do. Powless is affiliated with the Onondaga Nation and is also the assistant director of the Native Student Program at Syracuse University. If Powless signed on, he worried it would hurt his own reputation with those organizations.
But Powless felt it was his duty to spread the correct message about Native American culture, so he signed on.
Powless grew up on the Onondaga Reservation, where he said, “lacrosse is part of our heritage and our culture.”
He played professionally for six seasons, was a three-time All-American and played in the World Lacrosse Championships in 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2004 for the Iroquois team.
But lacrosse is far more than a sport in Native American culture. It’s a “medicine game,” or a spiritual healing game, and is still played in this tradition every year on the reservation.
“In this area, it’s very important to our identity and who we are,” Powless said. “It’s another way of sharing our culture.”
Though different versions of the game have been played throughout Native American history, the field version that’s now played internationally originated with the Iroquois people.
So, when filmmakers looking to create a Native American lacrosse movie had trouble with their audition process, they went back to lacrosse’s Onondagan roots.
That’s where they found Powless. Producers arrived at a lacrosse practice at the Onondaga Nation Arena and started talking to Powless on the sidelines. He gave them tips about lacrosse from a Native American perspective and also suggested players to keep an eye on.
“I was pointing out guys that not only had the skill, had the look with the long hair and the braids, but also understood the culture and heritage of what the sport meant,” Powless said. “Sure enough, these guys ended up with speaking roles.”
After helping find actors, Powless was offered a job with the movie. But before getting involved, he decided that the script needed to be rewritten, to protect both himself and the actors he helped to recruit.
“I couldn’t send them out to do the things they were expecting them to do for the movie,” Powless said. “They wouldn’t have been allowed to come home if their people saw the movie. They would’ve been embarrassed.”
At the time, Powless had just signed his contract to start his current position at SU. He hadn’t even moved everything into his office yet. This meant he had the time to rewrite the script. But it also meant he had more on the line.
“It was a big jump because I knew what was at stake,” Powless said. “I went in with both feet and I had to make sure that I committed to it. I did everything I possibly could to make sure that the end product was respectful, yet entertaining.
Ira Huff, a senior English and textual studies major and Tonawanda Seneca Nation lacrosse player, said he appreciated what the movie did to put the Native American image in a good light.
“Because you can only do cowboys and Indians so much,” he said.
Huff said he thinks the movie did what it could, but he doesn’t think the way to bridge the gap between Native Americans and others in the campus community is through a movie.
“There has to be dialogue,” Huff said. “We live so close together, we live amongst one another, but that kind of openness hasn’t really come about.”
Huff is a part of the Native American Students at Syracuse, which he said tries to raise visibility and get involved in the campus community.
“We have our challenges because not everyone’s willing to listen,” he said. “Or not everyone even knows we exist.”
Powless said though “Crooked Arrows” is still about two-thirds reality and one-third Hollywood, there are subtle things in the movie that make it so even Native American people can learn a little bit as they watch it.
He said some Onondaga parents have told him their children have watched the movie upward of 30 times, reciting it word for word, which magnifies the importance of the movie’s lessons.
“It’s these little things that are subliminal that are in this movie,” Powless said. “These kids are going to end up thinking about college and educating themselves and moving forward.”
Tyler Hill, a lifelong Onondaga lacrosse player who played Silverfoot in “Crooked Arrows,” said he appreciated the opportunity this movie gave him to serve as a good role model for those children.
“That’s who the movie really was made for anyways; the kids, our future players,” Hill said. “That’s just a really good feeling to know that you’re somebody’s role model.”
He has visited many different Native American communities and said that everywhere he goes, people and their children tell him they loved the movie.
“I knew no matter what this movie was going to be a positive thing for our people,” Hill said. “So I was just happy and grateful to be a part of it, to spread the game of lacrosse and make a difference in the youth.”
Hill and Powless are both striving for this idea of spreading the message and making changes for the future. For Powless, confirmation of his cause came in the form of an email from a mother thanking him for the opportunity the movie gave her daughter.
The girl was only about 13. Her mother and grandmother found out that she had been telling people she was Italian because she was ashamed of her Native American heritage.
When “Crooked Arrows” needed Native American extras, they sent her on the bus without telling her what the movie was for.
She stepped off the bus, surrounded by countless Native American extras, actors and a Native American co-producer. They were all proud to be Native American, all happy to be there and be playing the Native American role in this movie, Powless said.
At the end of the 12 hours on set, she walked through her front door, turned to her mother and grandmother and said: “‘I’ll never say that I’m Italian again.’”
“Why wouldn’t I get involved in this movie?” Powless said. “To have an opportunity to do that, for someone to be proud of who they are, that’s why I do what I do.”

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

5 LIFE LESSONS FROM THE LOYOLA GREYHOUNDS


5 LIFE LESSONS FROM THE LOYOLA GREYHOUNDS

When you attend a lacrosse convention, you have an incredible opportunity to learn from some of the most brilliant minds in the game. I’ve been to five or six conventions now, and each time in a different capacity. For example, I have attended as an assistant varsity high school coach, the head freshman high school coach, and this year, as some guy who writes stuff.
I rolled up to Baltimore for the IMLCA convention, and since the X’s and O’s didn’t apply to me this time around, I had to look at things a little differently from how I would when I was coaching. I attended a presentation from the Loyola coaching staff titled “A Day in the life of a Greyhound” and picked up five lessons that you can apply to pretty much anything in your life.
Loyola Maryland National Championship Lacrosse NCAA
You want to learn from these guys!

1. Give Credit Where Credit Is Due

The staff began the presentation by listing and thanking some of the coaches who taught them along the way, from Dave Cottle to Mike Pressler and Bill Tierney. Who bought you that first stick? Who taught you to avoid the overhead check coming out of a roll dodge? Anybody give you some advice in passing that you’ve held onto for years? Wherever you are, whoever you are, chances are that you didn’t get there alone. Make sure the people who’ve helped you know they’re appreciated.

2. Take Responsibility, Look Out For Others

Loyola’s slides (PowerPoint, not the defensive kind) featured the phrase “Discipline is an all the time thing”, and for good reason. Here’s how it goes with the Greyhounds:
Don’t push your chair in after film review? You sprint. Leave some papers in the film room? Yup, you sprint. Your neighbor leaves garbage in the bottom of his locker? Guess what? You both sprint. Him for being wrong, and you for not straightening him out. Don’t let it happen again.

3. Don’t Cheat

When discussing elements of their practice routine, a member of the coaching staff gave his opinion on players who just barely touch the line (instead of running through it) during sprints:
“When you run a full field sprint, I don’t see the point in running 109 yards.”
I couldn’t agree more. Look, you can run 109 yards if you want, but someone else is running 110. That someone will probably beat you, and they will deserve it.

4. Prepare In Advance

Little-known fact: Growing up in Akron, Ohio, young Lebron James never dribbled a basketball on his own; he carried it around until practice started, dribbled it, and immediately picked it back up when practice was over.
Another fact: The above statement was a total lie.
Of course Bronbron didn’t do that. He dribbled a basketball a lot, which is one of the reasons he’s particularly good at dribbling a basketball. Somewhat reasonable (and true) lacrosse analogy: Loyola’s offensive players (and some poles) hit the wall for 100 righty throws and 100 lefty throws every day before practice. Do you? If you want to be really good at something, you’re going to have to put the extra work in, not just the regular work.

5. There Is Always More To Learn

When I looked at the crowd during Loyola’s presentation, I saw coaches from youth programs, high schools, junior colleges, club teams; you name it (you can tell by the team polos, windbreakers, etc that most people wear to conventions). You know who was sitting in the crowd, picking up tips with the rest of us nobodies? Johns Hopkins’ own Dave Pietramala.
And Petro wasn’t the only big-time D1 coach in there, either. You may know 99% of what’s being taught, but that remaining 1% could be the difference between winning a championship and sitting at home wondering what went wrong.

Overall

It’s almost impossible to attend a lacrosse convention without learning a few lessons, even if they don’t come in the form the presenters intended. Thanks to the Loyola staff for a well-done and informative presentation, and check back in the upcoming days for updates from the IMLCA convention.

5 LIFE LESSONS FROM THE LOYOLA GREYHOUNDS


5 LIFE LESSONS FROM THE LOYOLA GREYHOUNDS

When you attend a lacrosse convention, you have an incredible opportunity to learn from some of the most brilliant minds in the game. I’ve been to five or six conventions now, and each time in a different capacity. For example, I have attended as an assistant varsity high school coach, the head freshman high school coach, and this year, as some guy who writes stuff.
I rolled up to Baltimore for the IMLCA convention, and since the X’s and O’s didn’t apply to me this time around, I had to look at things a little differently from how I would when I was coaching. I attended a presentation from the Loyola coaching staff titled “A Day in the life of a Greyhound” and picked up five lessons that you can apply to pretty much anything in your life.
Loyola Maryland National Championship Lacrosse NCAA
You want to learn from these guys!

1. Give Credit Where Credit Is Due

The staff began the presentation by listing and thanking some of the coaches who taught them along the way, from Dave Cottle to Mike Pressler and Bill Tierney. Who bought you that first stick? Who taught you to avoid the overhead check coming out of a roll dodge? Anybody give you some advice in passing that you’ve held onto for years? Wherever you are, whoever you are, chances are that you didn’t get there alone. Make sure the people who’ve helped you know they’re appreciated.

2. Take Responsibility, Look Out For Others

Loyola’s slides (PowerPoint, not the defensive kind) featured the phrase “Discipline is an all the time thing”, and for good reason. Here’s how it goes with the Greyhounds:
Don’t push your chair in after film review? You sprint. Leave some papers in the film room? Yup, you sprint. Your neighbor leaves garbage in the bottom of his locker? Guess what? You both sprint. Him for being wrong, and you for not straightening him out. Don’t let it happen again.

3. Don’t Cheat

When discussing elements of their practice routine, a member of the coaching staff gave his opinion on players who just barely touch the line (instead of running through it) during sprints:
“When you run a full field sprint, I don’t see the point in running 109 yards.”
I couldn’t agree more. Look, you can run 109 yards if you want, but someone else is running 110. That someone will probably beat you, and they will deserve it.

4. Prepare In Advance

Little-known fact: Growing up in Akron, Ohio, young Lebron James never dribbled a basketball on his own; he carried it around until practice started, dribbled it, and immediately picked it back up when practice was over.
Another fact: The above statement was a total lie.
Of course Bronbron didn’t do that. He dribbled a basketball a lot, which is one of the reasons he’s particularly good at dribbling a basketball. Somewhat reasonable (and true) lacrosse analogy: Loyola’s offensive players (and some poles) hit the wall for 100 righty throws and 100 lefty throws every day before practice. Do you? If you want to be really good at something, you’re going to have to put the extra work in, not just the regular work.

5. There Is Always More To Learn

When I looked at the crowd during Loyola’s presentation, I saw coaches from youth programs, high schools, junior colleges, club teams; you name it (you can tell by the team polos, windbreakers, etc that most people wear to conventions). You know who was sitting in the crowd, picking up tips with the rest of us nobodies? Johns Hopkins’ own Dave Pietramala.
And Petro wasn’t the only big-time D1 coach in there, either. You may know 99% of what’s being taught, but that remaining 1% could be the difference between winning a championship and sitting at home wondering what went wrong.

Overall

It’s almost impossible to attend a lacrosse convention without learning a few lessons, even if they don’t come in the form the presenters intended. Thanks to the Loyola staff for a well-done and informative presentation, and check back in the upcoming days for updates from the IMLCA convention.

ACC Coaches' Preseason All-Conference




ACC Coaches' Preseason All-Conference
Attackmen:  Jordan Wolf, Duke; Marcus Holman, North Carolina; Jimmy Bitter, North Carolina
Midfielders:  Chris LaPierre, Virginia; John Haus, Maryland; Rob Emery, Virginia
Face-Off:  R.G. Keenan, North Carolina
Short Stick Defensive Midfielder: Landon Carr, Maryland
Long Stick Defensive Midfielder: Jesse Bernhardt, Maryland
Defensemen:  Scott McWilliams, Virginia; Chris Hipps, Duke; Goran Murray, Maryland
Goalkeeper:  Niko Amato, Maryland
Coaches' Preseason Poll
1T. Maryland
1T. Duke
3T. Virginia
3T. North Carolina

ACC Coaches' Preseason All-Conference




ACC Coaches' Preseason All-Conference
Attackmen:  Jordan Wolf, Duke; Marcus Holman, North Carolina; Jimmy Bitter, North Carolina
Midfielders:  Chris LaPierre, Virginia; John Haus, Maryland; Rob Emery, Virginia
Face-Off:  R.G. Keenan, North Carolina
Short Stick Defensive Midfielder: Landon Carr, Maryland
Long Stick Defensive Midfielder: Jesse Bernhardt, Maryland
Defensemen:  Scott McWilliams, Virginia; Chris Hipps, Duke; Goran Murray, Maryland
Goalkeeper:  Niko Amato, Maryland
Coaches' Preseason Poll
1T. Maryland
1T. Duke
3T. Virginia
3T. North Carolina

Monday, December 10, 2012

Gary and Paul Gait - Two Brothers, One Legacy



Gary and Paul Gait - Two Brothers, One Legacy



UVA Men's Lacrosse 2013 Schedule - days and times!



Virginia men's lacrosse head coach Dom Starsia announced his team's schedule for the 2013 season today. UVa, a 2012 NCAA quarterfinalist, boasts a schedule which features nine home games and contests against five teams that saw postseason action in last year’s NCAA Championship. Starsia announces his schedule on the heels of Inside Lacrosse's Face-Off Yearbook ranking UVa No. 9 in its preseason poll.
Virginia men's lacrosse head coach Dom Starsia announced his team's schedule for the 2013 season today. UVa, a 2012 NCAA quarterfinalist, boasts a schedule which features nine home games and contests against five teams that saw postseason action in last year’s NCAA Championship. Starsia announces his schedule on the heels of Inside Lacrosse's Face-Off Yearbook ranking UVa No. 9 in its preseason poll.

DateOpponent / EventLocationTime
02/16/13vs. DrexelCharlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
02/19/13vs. VMICharlottesville7:00 p.m. ET
02/23/13at Stony BrookStony Brook, N.Y.12:00 p.m. ET
02/26/13vs. Mount St. Mary'sCharlottesville7:00 p.m. ET
03/01/13at SyracuseSyracuse, N.Y.TBA
03/05/13vs. VermontCharlottesville7:00 p.m. ET
03/09/13vs. CornellCharlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
03/16/13vs. Ohio StateCharlottesville3:00 p.m. ET
Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic (M&T Bank Stadium)
03/23/13vs. Johns HopkinsBaltimore, Md.4:30 p.m. ET
03/30/13vs. Maryland *Charlottesville2:00 p.m. ET,
04/06/13vs. North Carolina *Charlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
04/12/13at Duke *Durham, N.C.6:00 p.m. ET
04/20/13vs. BellarmineCharlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
ACC Championship
04/26/13SemifinalsChapel Hill, N.C.TBA
04/28/13FinalsChapel Hill, N.C.TBA
NCAA Championship
05/11/13First RoundHome SitesTBA
05/12/13First RoundHome SitesTBA
05/18/13Quarterfinals (South)College Park, Md.TBA
05/19/13Quarterfinals (North)Lucas Oil Stadium (Indianapolis, Ind.)TBA
NCAA Final Four (Lincoln Financial Field)
05/25/13SemifinalsPhiladelphia, Pa.TBA
05/27/13FinalsPhiladelphia, Pa.TBA


UVA Men's Lacrosse 2013 Schedule - days and times!



Virginia men's lacrosse head coach Dom Starsia announced his team's schedule for the 2013 season today. UVa, a 2012 NCAA quarterfinalist, boasts a schedule which features nine home games and contests against five teams that saw postseason action in last year’s NCAA Championship. Starsia announces his schedule on the heels of Inside Lacrosse's Face-Off Yearbook ranking UVa No. 9 in its preseason poll.
Virginia men's lacrosse head coach Dom Starsia announced his team's schedule for the 2013 season today. UVa, a 2012 NCAA quarterfinalist, boasts a schedule which features nine home games and contests against five teams that saw postseason action in last year’s NCAA Championship. Starsia announces his schedule on the heels of Inside Lacrosse's Face-Off Yearbook ranking UVa No. 9 in its preseason poll.

DateOpponent / EventLocationTime
02/16/13vs. DrexelCharlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
02/19/13vs. VMICharlottesville7:00 p.m. ET
02/23/13at Stony BrookStony Brook, N.Y.12:00 p.m. ET
02/26/13vs. Mount St. Mary'sCharlottesville7:00 p.m. ET
03/01/13at SyracuseSyracuse, N.Y.TBA
03/05/13vs. VermontCharlottesville7:00 p.m. ET
03/09/13vs. CornellCharlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
03/16/13vs. Ohio StateCharlottesville3:00 p.m. ET
Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic (M&T Bank Stadium)
03/23/13vs. Johns HopkinsBaltimore, Md.4:30 p.m. ET
03/30/13vs. Maryland *Charlottesville2:00 p.m. ET,
04/06/13vs. North Carolina *Charlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
04/12/13at Duke *Durham, N.C.6:00 p.m. ET
04/20/13vs. BellarmineCharlottesville1:00 p.m. ET
ACC Championship
04/26/13SemifinalsChapel Hill, N.C.TBA
04/28/13FinalsChapel Hill, N.C.TBA
NCAA Championship
05/11/13First RoundHome SitesTBA
05/12/13First RoundHome SitesTBA
05/18/13Quarterfinals (South)College Park, Md.TBA
05/19/13Quarterfinals (North)Lucas Oil Stadium (Indianapolis, Ind.)TBA
NCAA Final Four (Lincoln Financial Field)
05/25/13SemifinalsPhiladelphia, Pa.TBA
05/27/13FinalsPhiladelphia, Pa.TBA


Virginia Releases 2013 Men's Lacrosse Schedule


Virginia Releases 2013 Men's Lacrosse Schedule

VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOMRob Emery
VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM
Rob EmeryVIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM

Dec. 10, 2012




• 2013 Men's Lacrosse Schedule

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Virginia men's lacrosse head coach Dom Starsia announced his team's schedule for the 2013 season today. UVa, a 2012 NCAA quarterfinalist, boasts a schedule which features nine home games and contests against five teams that saw postseason action in last year’s NCAA Championship. Starsia announces his schedule on the heels of Inside Lacrosse's Face-Off Yearbook ranking UVa No. 9 in its preseason poll.

“Announcing our schedule is always the first sign that spring is not too far off,” said Starsia. “While the quality of the competition in our regular season is not for the faint of heart, players, coaches and fans of Virginia Lacrosse look forward to some exciting moments.”

The 84th season of Virginia lacrosse commences on Feb. 16 when Drexel come to Klöckner Stadium, the 12th year in a row Virginia has started its season against the Dragons. UVa faces in-state foe VMI for the seventh year in a row when the Keydets make the jaunt to Charlottesville on Feb. 19.

Virginia heads to Long Island on Feb. 23 for its first road contest of the season when it faces the Stony Brook Seawolves.  UVa returns home Feb. 26 for a midweek tilt with Mount St. Mary’s.

The Cavaliers head back to the Empire State to face Syracuse in the Carrier Dome on March 1. UVa returns home for three-straight games inside the historic confines of Klöckner Stadium, beginning March 5 against former UVa All-America defenseman Ryan Curtis' Vermont squad.

The Cornell Big Red come to Charlottesville for the first time since 2009 when UVa hosts the Ivy League foe on March 9. UVa concludes the three-game home stand with Ohio State on March 16 for the seventh all-time meeting in a series that began in 1968, but went on hiatus until 1999.

 

 

Virginia heads to the Charm City on March 23 for a meeting with Johns Hopkins for the Doyle Smith Cup. The previously released contest will be part of a double-header at Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium in Inside Lacrosse’s seventh annual Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic. The contest with the Blue Jays is the 66th season in a row the teams have played each other and marks the first regular-season game in the series not played on either of the schools’ campuses. All seven previous neutral-site games with the Blue Jays have been played in the NCAA Tournament.
Virginia opens ACC play on March 30 when Maryland comes to Klöckner Stadium, followed by North Carolina visiting Charlottesville on April 6. UVa concludes ACC play on April 12 at Duke. UVa faces Bellarmine for the second time in program history and the first time since 2006 when they come to Charlottesville for Senior Day on April 20, concluding the regular-season portion of the schedule.

Virginia travels to Chapel Hill, N.C., for the 2013 ACC Championship on April 26 and 28. North Carolina is hosting the league tournament for the first time since 2009.

The NCAA Championship begins May 11-12 at home sites, followed by the quarterfinals at either Maryland’s Byrd Stadium (South) on May 18 or Indianapolis’ Lucas Oil Stadium (North) on May 19. Notre Dame and Indiana Sports Corporation will host the quarterfinal match-ups in the home venue of the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts.
The Final Four returns to Philadelphia’s Lincoln Financial Field, the site of the event in 2005 and UVa’s NCAA title run in 2006. The third Final Four to be held at Lincoln Financial Field will be hosted by Drexel with the semifinals on May 25, followed by the finals on May 27.

“From the opener with an excellent Drexel team to the ACC Tournament, I do not believe there is a more challenging schedule to be found,” said Starsia. “The promise of 2013 will help us all get through the advent of winter, but we will be facing off before you know it.”

All dates, locations and times are subject to change and a list of televised contests will be announced at a later date.
Season tickets for men's lacrosse go on sale Jan. 7 at 9 a.m. The all lacrosse season pass for reserved seats is $60. The all lacrosse season pass for adult general admission is $50, while the all lacrosse season pass for youth, senior citizens and faculty/staff general admission is $40. The all season pass is good for all men's and women's lacrosse home games. A reserved season ticket for all nine men's lacrosse home games is $50.

Virginia sold out of reserved seat season tickets last year and all season ticket holders from last year will have priority on renewal. All new reserved seat orders for 2013 will be put on a waiting list and seating will be done based on priority. Patrons on the waitlist from last year will be carried over to this year.
Single-game tickets will go on sale Feb. 8.

Virginia Releases 2013 Men's Lacrosse Schedule


Virginia Releases 2013 Men's Lacrosse Schedule

VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOMRob Emery
VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM
Rob EmeryVIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM

Dec. 10, 2012




• 2013 Men's Lacrosse Schedule

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Virginia men's lacrosse head coach Dom Starsia announced his team's schedule for the 2013 season today. UVa, a 2012 NCAA quarterfinalist, boasts a schedule which features nine home games and contests against five teams that saw postseason action in last year’s NCAA Championship. Starsia announces his schedule on the heels of Inside Lacrosse's Face-Off Yearbook ranking UVa No. 9 in its preseason poll.

“Announcing our schedule is always the first sign that spring is not too far off,” said Starsia. “While the quality of the competition in our regular season is not for the faint of heart, players, coaches and fans of Virginia Lacrosse look forward to some exciting moments.”

The 84th season of Virginia lacrosse commences on Feb. 16 when Drexel come to Klöckner Stadium, the 12th year in a row Virginia has started its season against the Dragons. UVa faces in-state foe VMI for the seventh year in a row when the Keydets make the jaunt to Charlottesville on Feb. 19.

Virginia heads to Long Island on Feb. 23 for its first road contest of the season when it faces the Stony Brook Seawolves.  UVa returns home Feb. 26 for a midweek tilt with Mount St. Mary’s.

The Cavaliers head back to the Empire State to face Syracuse in the Carrier Dome on March 1. UVa returns home for three-straight games inside the historic confines of Klöckner Stadium, beginning March 5 against former UVa All-America defenseman Ryan Curtis' Vermont squad.

The Cornell Big Red come to Charlottesville for the first time since 2009 when UVa hosts the Ivy League foe on March 9. UVa concludes the three-game home stand with Ohio State on March 16 for the seventh all-time meeting in a series that began in 1968, but went on hiatus until 1999.

 

 

Virginia heads to the Charm City on March 23 for a meeting with Johns Hopkins for the Doyle Smith Cup. The previously released contest will be part of a double-header at Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium in Inside Lacrosse’s seventh annual Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic. The contest with the Blue Jays is the 66th season in a row the teams have played each other and marks the first regular-season game in the series not played on either of the schools’ campuses. All seven previous neutral-site games with the Blue Jays have been played in the NCAA Tournament.
Virginia opens ACC play on March 30 when Maryland comes to Klöckner Stadium, followed by North Carolina visiting Charlottesville on April 6. UVa concludes ACC play on April 12 at Duke. UVa faces Bellarmine for the second time in program history and the first time since 2006 when they come to Charlottesville for Senior Day on April 20, concluding the regular-season portion of the schedule.

Virginia travels to Chapel Hill, N.C., for the 2013 ACC Championship on April 26 and 28. North Carolina is hosting the league tournament for the first time since 2009.

The NCAA Championship begins May 11-12 at home sites, followed by the quarterfinals at either Maryland’s Byrd Stadium (South) on May 18 or Indianapolis’ Lucas Oil Stadium (North) on May 19. Notre Dame and Indiana Sports Corporation will host the quarterfinal match-ups in the home venue of the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts.
The Final Four returns to Philadelphia’s Lincoln Financial Field, the site of the event in 2005 and UVa’s NCAA title run in 2006. The third Final Four to be held at Lincoln Financial Field will be hosted by Drexel with the semifinals on May 25, followed by the finals on May 27.

“From the opener with an excellent Drexel team to the ACC Tournament, I do not believe there is a more challenging schedule to be found,” said Starsia. “The promise of 2013 will help us all get through the advent of winter, but we will be facing off before you know it.”

All dates, locations and times are subject to change and a list of televised contests will be announced at a later date.
Season tickets for men's lacrosse go on sale Jan. 7 at 9 a.m. The all lacrosse season pass for reserved seats is $60. The all lacrosse season pass for adult general admission is $50, while the all lacrosse season pass for youth, senior citizens and faculty/staff general admission is $40. The all season pass is good for all men's and women's lacrosse home games. A reserved season ticket for all nine men's lacrosse home games is $50.

Virginia sold out of reserved seat season tickets last year and all season ticket holders from last year will have priority on renewal. All new reserved seat orders for 2013 will be put on a waiting list and seating will be done based on priority. Patrons on the waitlist from last year will be carried over to this year.
Single-game tickets will go on sale Feb. 8.

Saturday, December 8, 2012

UVa Places Four on Preseason All-America Team



UVa Places Four on Preseason All-America Team

VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOMRob Emery
VIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM
Rob EmeryVIRGINIASPORTSDOTCOM

Dec. 4, 2012




CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – The Virginia men’s lacrosse team placed four players on the 2013 Inside LacrosseFace-Off Yearbook Preseason All-America team.  Midfielder Chris LaPierre leads the UVa honorees as the only first-team member.
LaPierre (Medford, N.J.), a second-team USILA All-American in 2012, is a two-time All-ACC pick and was a third-team USILA All-American in 2011. He led UVa with 63 ground balls in 2012 and scored four goals and dished out two assists primarily as a defensive midfielder.
The senior LaPierre is joined by juniors midfielder Rob Emery and defenseman Scott McWilliams, who were named to the preseason All-America third team. Sophomore midfielder Ryan Tucker rounds out the Cavaliers on the list with honorable mention honors.
Emery (San Francisco, Calif.) was an honorable mention USILA All-American in 2012 after scoring 24 goals.  McWilliams (Mountain Lakes, N.J.) was also an honorable mention USILA All-American in 2012 after picking up 29 ground balls and causing 11 turnovers. Tucker (Towson, Md.) was a member of the 2012 USA U-19 team that won a gold medal at the World Championships in Turku, Finland. He also appeared in all 16 games for the Cavaliers during his freshman campaign, scoring 13 goals, tying him with Emery (in 2011) for No. 2 amongst freshmen UVa midfielders under head coach Dom Starsia all-time.
Virginia posted a 12-4 record in 2012 and made its 35th NCAA Tournament appearance, the 19th under Starsia. The Cavaliers return five starters, 25 letterwinners and seven of their top 10-point scorers, but lost their top three point scorers to graduation. UVa welcomes the nation’s No. 2 recruiting class according to Inside Lacrosse and 13 newcomers, including fifth-year transfer Charlie Streep and third-year transfer Matt Robertson.  Also new to the team and not part of the ranked recruiting class is Thompson Brown, who was a scholarship football player for UVa in 2011.